State of Working Wisconsin Reports

Below is a list of State of Working Wisconsin reports. Explore other topics here and all High Road Strategy Center reports here.

  • Dresser, L., and P. Aquiles-Sanchez. From Community Benefits, to Collective Bargaining, and Back . High Road Strategy Center, 2024.

    A good Community Benefits Agreement is crucial to generating strong community results from public investments in private interests such as sports stadiums. Milwaukee’s first CBA was successful at establishing labor peace and provided space for workers to create their union, the Milwaukee Area Service and Hospitality Workers Organization (MASH). In this report, we illustrate the ways in which MASH has been able to successfully secure improvements in employment and job quality standards for service workers in Milwaukee’s Deer District and beyond.

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  • Dresser, L., and P. Aquiles-Sanchez. Covering the Bases: Community Benefits for Public Subsidies in Kansas City. High Road Strategy Center, 2024.
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  • Dresser, L., and P. Aquiles-Sanchez. Can’t Survive on $7.25: Higher Minimum Wages for Working Wisconsin. COWS, 2023.

    For 15 years, Wisconsin’s minimum wage has been stuck at the federal minimum level of $7.25, which has not been raised since 2009. A higher and well enforced minimum wage helps build a floor that allows workers, employers, and our communities to thrive. In this report, we offer a picture of who wins in Wisconsin with higher minimum wages and some reasons to support higher labor standards for the state. A stronger floor is necessary and possible in Wisconsin. Workers can’t survive on $7.25. It is time to raise the floor.

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  • Aquiles-Sanchez, P., L. Dresser, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2023. COWS.

    In celebration of Wisconsin workers, COWS releases The State of Working Wisconsin 2023 with the most recent data available on wages, jobs, disparities, and unions to build a stronger understanding of what is going on in the state’s labor market.

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  • Over the past 40 years, the union manufacturing jobs that once flourished in Milwaukee have been replaced by low-wage, non-union service jobs, exacerbating racial and economic disparities. Properly addressing the intertwined issues of declining union and manufacturing jobs and growing racial disparity starts with restructuring the city’s service sector. In this report, we take a deep look into the city’s service jobs across multiple industries and occupations. We also hear from workers themselves on what is empowering them and what remains unaddressed on the city’s economic frontlines.

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  • In May 2022, Kenosha-based Bear Development and Kacmarcik Enterprises announced plans to begin work on a soccer stadium accompanied by ancillary, mixed-use developments – “The Iron District” – in downtown Milwaukee. This report centers the question of how to ensure true community benefits from public investment in private interests such as the Iron District. If local political leaders commit public money to private projects in Milwaukee, then political leaders must secure and advance the public interest. A strong Community Benefit Agreement (CBA) is the most certain and robust way for communities to obtain real and lasting returns from large-scale private developments.

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  • Developers often approach cities disguising their private ventures as irresistible public goods. Asking for public money for sports stadiums and entertainment venues, they promise economic development, urban renewal, and neighborhood revitalization. Despite the big promises, public investments are often neither transparent nor accountable. As a result, securing public benefit from these deals is rare.

    Developers have seized soccer’s increasing popularity to design soccer stadium projects with ancillary commercial and residential development in urban centers across the nation. As with other urban developments and sports stadiums, the payoffs for communities remain murky at best.

    This trend has come to Milwaukee. In May 2022, Kenosha-based Bear Development and Kacmarcik Enterprises released a development plan for an “Iron District” on the southwestern end of downtown Milwaukee. Playing with Public Money in Milwaukee provides Milwaukee residents and political leaders background information and additional context as this proposal is considered, offering an overview of relevant research on the economic impact of sports arenas and information on recent public investment in soccer stadiums in five other cities.

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  • Aquiles-Sanchez, P., L. Dresser, A. Milewski, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2022. COWS, 2022.

    In celebration of Wisconsin workers, COWS releases The State of Working Wisconsin 2022 with the most recent data available on wages, jobs, disparities, and unions to build a stronger understanding of what is going on in the state’s labor market. Released for Labor Day 2022, this year’s report also features a series of profiles highlighting stories of workers organizing across Wisconsin.

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  • Dresser, L., P. Aquiles-Sanchez, and A. Kanter. The Crisis in Milwaukee’s Service Industry. COWS, 2022.

    There’s a crisis in service work in Milwaukee. Too many of these jobs—in food service, janitorial work, security services, and human and health services—offer low wages, inadequate and often unpredictable hours, and benefits packages that are usually weak, if they exist at all. For Milwaukee, these jobs have been a sorry replacement for the good union manufacturing jobs that once defined opportunity in the city. This economic transformation has especially damaged Milwaukee’s Black community, resulting in extreme racial disparity.

    All of this was well documented before COVID-19. In the last two years, the underlying crisis in these jobs has been exposed and it has grown. Until we build a strong, consistent floor of better wages, more predictable hours, and stronger benefits in these jobs, the crisis will continue.

    The City of Milwaukee can help to lead this effort. In every aspect of policy, the City can seek to strengthen job quality, raise labor standards, and support and build a high-road approach to service work in the city.

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  • Dresser, L., and W. Kahn. Toward a New Tradition in "Nontraditional Occupations". COWS, 2021.

    For decades, a handful of women have been celebrated as pioneers in construction, manufacturing, transportation, and distribution careers. Despite years of work, these occupations remain “nontraditional” for women and people of color and present unique barriers and challenges. Raising Women’s Success in Apprenticeship (RSWA) is driving systemic change to make these industries more open, accepting, and inclusive of nontraditional workers. This report summarizes the network’s work, identifies key factors of success for getting women into nontraditional jobs, and identifies the remaining challenges that will require a substantial change in policy and practice to make success for women the norm.

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  • Briggs , X. de S., and J. Rogers. “A More Democratic Federalism?”. Democracy, Vol. 62, 2021.
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  • Bernstein, S., and J. Rogers. 7 Steps to Municipal Resilience & Recovery. COWS, 2021, p. 9.
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  • $15 by 2025: Who Gains with a Higher Minimum Wage in Wisconsin is a short fact sheet about the demographics of who would benefit from raising the minimum wage by 2025 and how Wisconsin compares to other states on this issue.

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  • Dresser, L., A. Kanter, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2021. COWS, 2021.

    Released for Labor Day 2021, the State of Working Wisconsin report focuses on how working people are doing and continues to shine a spotlight on the state’s brutal Black-white disparities.

    A project of COWS, the State of Working Wisconsin has presented the workers’ perspective on the economy in the state for more than two decades: who is winning, and who is being left out; where is disparity growing; and what’s happening to the economic chasm separating Black and white workers in the state.

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  • City leaders, including mayors, play a critical role in community wealth building and are this brief’s intended audience. However, this work requires multiple actors, including community organizers and developers. This brief is useful to anyone committed to equitable economic development in their community but is intended primarily for city leaders. This report was made possible by generous funding from the Surdna Foundation.

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  • Rogers, J., K. Knutson, and M. Bell. Productive Places in a Post-Pandemic Era: A Roadmap for Cities and Counties. Envisio Blog, 2020.
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  • Rogers, J. How About Productive Democracy for a Change. no. 1, Social Policy, 2020, pp. 19-25.
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  • McCahill, C., S. Jain, and M. Brenneis. Comparative Assessment of Accessibility Metrics across the U.S. Vol. 83, Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 2020.

    ABSTRACT: Accessibility-related research has advanced considerably since its foundational conception six decades ago. Yet, despite widespread acceptance of the concept, these methods are still rarely used in practical applications among transportation agencies and policymakers. Until recently, the challenges were mainly technical but now they are more practical. Practitioners are often faced with decisions about appropriate methods and metrics, which are difficult to answer from the current literature. This study attempts to produce a clearer understanding of the effects that those decisions have on practical outcomes, based on data spanning many geographies across the U.S. We test a variety of metrics—including different modes, destination types, analytical geographies, and metric definitions—in regions spanning seven states. This study points to several potential best practices, including the use of non-work walking accessibility metrics in multimodal analysis and the use of decay functions in accessibility metrics, and provides a strong foundation for future research.

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  • Jain, S., E. Sundquist, and C. McCahill. A Pathway to Healthy Growth in Eau Claire. 2020.

    The long-term health, sustainability and equity of Eau Claire, like any other community, depend on the policies and regulations that shape future development and transportation investments. As outlined in the City’s Comprehensive Plan, these policies should promote compact development and reinvestment in existing neighborhoods. This report leverages new and existing data—including accessibility analysis and property value information—to highlight key areas of opportunity and frame supportive policies to help move the City forward.

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  • Rogers, J. Biden’s Task and Ours. Vol. 50, no. 4, Social Policy, 2020, p. 9.
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  • Dresser, L. The State of Working Wisconsin 2020. COWS, 2020.

    For the State of Working Wisconsin 2020, COWS created a digital presence to tell the story of workers in the state during COVID-19. This exciting new report shines a spotlight on the brutal Black-white disparities that define this state and provides worker profiles to crystallize the human costs of this crisis. For more than two decades, COWS’ State of Working Wisconsin has presented the workers’ perspective on the economy in the state: what’s going on with work and jobs, who is winning in this economy, and who is being left out; where is disparity growing; what’s happening to the economic chasm separating Black and white workers in the state. The SOWW 2020 website can be seen here.

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  • Már Ársælsson, K., and J. Rogers. Digital’s Promise for Worker Organizing: A 2018 Update. LIFT (Labor Innovation for the 21st Century), 2019.

    Digital tools and technologies—most familiarly, apps, websites, internet search engines and social media platforms—have become a central and pervasive feature of our lives.

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  • In the 20th Century, people from around the world came to Wisconsin and the Midwest, seeking opportunity in the industrial boom. Manufacturing and unions helped create good jobs for many black workers, but discrimination and segregation limited that sharply. When industrial jobs declined, black Midwesterners suffered the most. Over the last 40 years, opportunity and outcomes for black residents in Wisconsin have fallen below national averages. As a result, black Wisconsinites face stubborn barriers and road blocks that many white people don’t even know are there. Racial disparity in Wisconsin is not inevitable, but closing the gap will require a broad focus and multifaceted approach.

    ‘Wisconsin’s Extreme Racial Disparity’ provides a Wisconsin-focused summary to ‘Race in the Heartland‘, which shows the persistence of racial disparities in the Midwest and what can be done about them.

    Wisconsin has the regrettable distinction of ranking among the worst states in the nation for racial inequality. Disparities among black and white residents of our state – spanning poverty, unemployment, educational attainment, and incarceration – have been documented consistently for more than a decade. Although activists and policymakers have increasingly focused on addressing these issues, they remain pressing.

    ‘Race in the Heartland’ and ‘Wisconsin’s Extreme Racial Disparity’ provide a careful historical context and a broadly informed policy framework that are critical to winning greater racial equity throughout this region.

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2019: Facts & Figures. COWS, 2019.

    Each year on Labor Day, COWS draws a picture of how working people in Wisconsin are faring. The long report, The State of Working Wisconsin, is released biannually on even-numbered years and looks at the economy comprehensively from a working-family perspective. In odd-numbered years, like 2019, we provide a more abbreviated and focused report, called The State of Working Wisconsin: Facts & Figures.

    On some of the most well-known economic indicators, there is good news for Wisconsin workers. The unemployment rate in the state has been consistently low. The economy is steadily adding jobs. These are important measures for working people’s lives. When jobs are more available not only is it easier to secure a job, it is also easier to get the hours of work you want, to be able to ask for time-off you need, and to make ends meet. This Labor Day, with the memory of the Great Recession of 2007 now fading from memory, workers across Wisconsin have this good news to celebrate.

    Even so, many working families in the state feel stressed and stretched. In this report, then, we provide information on few key long-term trends that are contributing to the stress even in the context of low unemployment. Looking across the last forty years, the challenges working people face are clear. Wage growth has been anemic. Income inequality is reaching new highs. Unions, which have been so critical to supporting workers in this state, are in serious decline. Additionally, state policy, which could be helping to close gaps, is actually exacerbating these trends. From tax changes that reward our highest income families to rejection of health insurance to cover our families in need, policy continues to pave the low-road for our state.

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  • This guide examines the case for addressing climate risk in investments, examine potential solutions and ways to implement them, and explore how reinvestments can create good jobs. This is specifically aimed at local governments, though the strategies and approaches have been proven effective in other sectors.

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  • Wisconsin has a current energy spending deficit of $14.4 billion ($14.4 billion in expenditures leaves the state annually). With no substantial in-state fossil fuel resources, reliance on fossil fuels is hurting the Wisconsin economy. Transitioning to in-state energy resources would bring dollars and jobs back to the state of Wisconsin and provide a win-win-win strategy for economic growth, social well-being, and environmental protection. This report was prepared for the Office of Sustainability, La Crosse County, Wisconsin.

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  • Braunginn, M., C. Jenkins, and M. Young-Jones. Setting the Agenda: A Mayor’s Guide to Water Affordability. Mayors Innovation Project, 2019.

    Aging water infrastructure systems, climate change, and the general rising cost of urban living mean that access to clean and affordable water is becoming a greater challenge. Cities and water utilities are increasingly faced with a major financial dilemma: increase rates to update infrastructure and price out ratepayers, or keep rates static at the expense of aging and failing infrastructure. At the fulcrum of this choice sits those most vulnerable to increases in rates: low-to-moderate income households, which are disproportionately made up of women and/or people of color.

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  • Jenkins, C., and M. Young-Jones. Actionable Solutions for Public Water Systems. Mayors Innovation Project, 2019.

    From climate change to outdated infrastructure to lack of federal support, city leaders face more pressure than ever to provide affordable and safe water to residents. Mayors and city leaders need the resources to plan for and improve and maintain public water systems. This report outlines concrete actions a city can take to keep control of its water systems and provides a background to understanding the complexity of public water systems and their current challenges. The solutions for managing robust public systems include topics such as: integrating management approaches for water with other goals; engaging the public in conversations about this valuable resource; promoting affordability of water services; among many more.

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  • Braunginn, M., E. DePalma, H. Neukrug, S. Rhodes-Conway, and M. Young-Jones. Basic Water Utility Management. Mayors Innovation Project, 2019.

    Access to safe and affordable drinking water is a human right, and it is the duty of the water utility to ensure that this right is protected and upheld. Understanding the different ways water intersects with your city is critical. Basic Water Utility Management provides local leaders with a foundation for understanding their local water systems, including: understanding what a successful water system looks like; getting up to speed on government compliance; identifying infrastructure and maintenance needs; and engaging with community members around water resources.

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  • Braunginn, M., E. DePalma, H. Neukrug, S. Rhodes-Conway, and M. Young-Jones. Paying for Water Systems. Mayors Innovation Project, 2019.

    Even as the scale of needed investment grows, utilities can develop rate structures, impact fees, and new products or services that generate needed revenue fairly. This report is a primer on getting started with financing water systems, including: assessing where the largest costs are incurred and where borrowing is most extensive; understanding your city’s specific water utility structure and financial status; building a relationship with your water utility manager/CEO(s); and reaching out to and growing relationships with community leaders across a range of neighborhoods and interests, and asking questions about needs and water affordability.

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  • Braunginn, M., J. Irwin, and S. Rhodes-Conway. Reducing Carbon Risk & Investing in Local Economic Strength. Mayors Innovation Project, 2019.

    Climate change poses a risk to communities and their investments. There is a growing toolbox of measures cities can take to combat climate change. One of these tools, divestment from fossil fuels, is ethical, viable, and a moral imperative. Successful divest/invest strategies are a matter of political will. Steps a city can take: determine if they have funds that should be divested; reinvest the capital moved from fossil fuel stocks to a Green Bank or Revolving Loan Fund; identify what opportunities there are to attract “fossil free” investments to sustainable projects via green bonds or other mechanisms; ensure that any jobs created through this process are quality jobs.

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  • Rogers, J., and K. Ársælsson. Digital’s Promise for Worker Organizing: A 2018 Update. LIFT: Labor Innovations for the 21st Century, 2019.
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  • McCahill, C., B. Osborne, and E. Sundquist. “, Rhodium Group, 2019.

    Transcending Oil, released in April 2018, describes Hawaii’s path toward meeting its ambitious clean energy goals by 2045. The report was commissioned by Elemental Excelerator and prepared independently by Rhodium Group and Smart Growth America. It focuses mainly on transitioning the electrical grid to renewable energy while moving large numbers of vehicles to electric power but also points to the importance of managing overall travel demand through transportation policies and investments.

    This technical guide describes the methods and findings behind Transcending Oil’s travel demand forecasts, developed by SSTI and Smart Growth America. Outlined in the report are two forecasts: a business as usual scenario and a policy scenario that includes multimodal transportation investments, transportation demand management, land use regulations and pricing mechanisms. Whereas business as usual could lead to a 16.6 percent increase in vehicle miles travel (VMT) by 2045, the policy scenario outlined in this document results in an estimated 7.3 percent reduction. This analysis points to the importance of comprehensive, widespread transportation and land use policies in achieving ambitious VMT reductions. The modeling approach described here may be useful in the development of similar long-term VMT management plans, since it relies on fairly straightforward methods, readily available data and assumptions derived from peer-reviewed research.

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  • Bell, A., D. Hardy, and C. McCahill. Accessibility Measurement for Project Prioritization in Virginia. Vol. 2673, no. 12, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2019, pp. 266-7.

    This paper describes the accessibility scoring approach applied by the Virginia Department of Transportation (DOT) in the Smart Scale project prioritization process in 2018. The accessibility scoring approach identifies the increase in jobs accessibility for candidate projects submitted for state funding. The Smart Scale process was implemented in 2015 and entered its third round of applications in 2018; some 800 projects were evaluated during its first two years. This paper contains the following elements: an general overview of jobs accessibility as defined and measured by Virginia DOT for the Smart Scale approach; the development of the Smart Scale accessibility scoring system, including a summary of research performed to identify system parameters; the relationship between mobility and accessibility; and the Smart Scale accessibility transferability to other locations and initiatives and the possible evolution of the Virginia DOT approach in the future.

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  • Securing strong economic opportunity for Wisconsin’s working families and closing racial and ethnic income disparity requires strong attention to the access and success of students of color at our state’s colleges and universities.

    In this report COWS focuses on college degrees – both the two year associates degrees offered by the 16 colleges of the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) and four year bachelor’s degrees offered by colleges throughout the University of Wisconsin System (UWS).

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  • Dresser, L., J. Rogers, E. Ubert, and A. Walther. State of Working Wisconsin 2018. COWS, 2018.

    Despite job gains, Wisconsin’s job growth is slow relative to the national pace. Wages are still in no way keeping pace with worker productivity. Wisconsin is comparatively weak in more lucrative occupations: professional, scientific, technical, and information. Our manufacturing sector, while growing, is a still significantly smaller than at the beginning of the century. And inequality continues to grow. One in five workers currently holds a poverty-wage job with few benefits. Rural economies are declining. Wisconsin’s black/white disparities still lead the nation.

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  • Equity in Apprenticeship is a report series which highlights programs that use apprenticeship to extend occupational opportunity to historically marginalized groups, especially people of color and women.

    These case studies of apprenticeship programs span the country and industries:

    1. Health Care Pathways in LA: New Apprenticeship Opportunities as an Industry Changes
      The Worker Education and Resource Center (WERC) in Los Angeles has become highly adept at preparing health care workers who share a cultural affinity with LA’s patient populations.
    2. Manufacturing Pathways in Milwaukee: Bringing Skills and Equity to Manufacturing’s Future
      The Industrial Manufacturing Technician (IMT) program is the product of collaboration between labor and management leaders in Milwaukee’s manufacturing sector and has created a new rung in the ladder in production jobs.
    3. Equity from the Frontline: Workers’ Insight and Leadership Supports a Network of Apprenticeships in Transit
      In California, the Joint Workforce Investment in the South Bay Valley Transportation Authority has developed a web of apprenticeships and advancement opportunities.

    Equity in Apprenticeship was funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. We are grateful for their generous support. The findings and conclusions presented in this series are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

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  • Dresser, L., S. Thomason, L. Austin, A. Bernhardt, K. Jacobs, and M. Whitebook. At the Wage Floor: Covering Homecare and Early Care and Education Workers in the New Generation of Minimum Wage Laws. COWS, 2018.

    In November 2012, fast-food workers in New York went on strike and the Fight for $15 was born. Over the last five years, the movement has lifted wages for more than 17 million workers across the nation by fighting for and winning numerous minimum wage policies (National Employment Law Project 2016). Substantial minimum wage increases are underway in California, New York, Oregon, and more than 30 cities and counties around the country. In states and cities covered by them, these new minimum wages will increase earnings for 25 to 40 percent of workers (Reich, Allegretto, and Montialoux 2017; Reich et al. 2016). After four decades of wage stagnation and rising inequality, the movement has delivered real, much needed, and meaningful progress in a remarkably short period of time.

    Fast food has been iconic in the discussions of the minimum wage, from the influential mid-1990s research that found no negative employment impact of wage increases in the industry, to the fast-food workers who have walked out on strike in cities across the country in recent years (Card and Kruger 1995). But of course the reach of these wage increases extends well beyond fast food to underpaid workers in multiple industries. The dynamics of minimum wage increases vary across industries based on each industry’s specific structure.

    Nowhere are the distinct dynamics more pronounced and challenging than for those employed in human services industries. This paper focuses on an important subset of these workers: those who provide homecare and early care and education services to the very young, people with disabilities, and those who are frail due to age or illness. We explain the pressing need to raise these workers’ wages and the unique structure of their industries that results in a funding squeeze for wage increases—at the root of this is the fact that most families are unable to afford all of the homecare and child care they need, never mind pay enough to ensure that workers earn a living wage, and public human services are chronically underfunded.

    These workers provide a critical (but too often unrecognized) public good; as such, we argue that a significant public investment is a necessary part of the solution, both to deliver minimum wage increases to these workers and to cover the significant unmet need for care. We provide background about the shared and divergent challenges in the homecare and early care and education industries, as well as review emerging policy initiatives to fund wage increases for homecare and early care and education workers and identify principles for public policy going forward.

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  • The UniverCity Alliance at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is looking for a new local government partner for the UniverCity Year program for the period of 2018-2021. Could this be your community?

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  • Improving Health Outcomes for All Through Local Policy Making”. The Municipality – Your Voice. Your Wisconsin, League of Wisconsin Municipalities, 2018.

    First featured in the March 2018 Community Health issue of The Municipality – Your Voice. Your Wisconsin. Published by the League of Wisconsin Municipalities.

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  • In the fourth quarter of 2017, Wisconsin added 12,500 jobs, most of them in October. In contrast to the strong October, in December, Wisconsin actually lost jobs. Still, over the quarter, the state’s job base grew. Growth was driven by private sector gains, with the state adding 15,200 private jobs. The state lost 2,700 public sector jobs across the quarter capping off a very weak year in the public sector. Wisconsin’s ended 2017 with 3,300 fewer public sector jobs than a year ago. Still, as with the quarter, so with the year. Private sector growth meant that the state jobs base grew 1.4 percent: Wisconsin added 40,200 jobs in 2017. The unemployment rate continues to drop slowly across the nation and Wisconsin is not an exception. Unemployment in Wisconsin stands now at 3.0%, significantly below the level of the end of 2016 and at its lowest point since the recession.

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  • Meder, M., S. Rhodes-Conway, and M. Wolf. A New Jersey That Works for Working People. COWS, 2018.

    New Jersey’s economy has not recovered from the recession like it could – and should – have. Economic difficulties that began with losses in manufacturing jobs throughout the 1980s have persisted. Despite a diverse population and a shift in land use from sprawling suburban growth to more infill development, job numbers and GDP are growing too slowly. And what growth there is, isn’t distributed equally. New Jersey struggles with extreme racial and economic disparities that distribute the benefits of the economy not as shared prosperity, but to the wealthy.

    State policy can and must lift up working people and their families, creating a more equitable and inclusive New Jersey. The State must act to raise labor market standards, creating more jobs that pay good wages and provide full benefits. State economic development strategy should also adopt higher standards, ensuring that only businesses that provide good jobs are incentivized with public funds. Housing and transportation policy at the state level should direct resources and planning toward more connected, dense neighborhoods that are either near job centers or within easy, affordable transit access to job opportunities; key to this will be ensuring that affordable housing is available, especially in areas with increasing development. Additionally, policy shifts can uphold the civil rights of people of color and immigrants, while also protecting these communities from disproportionate health and economic impacts of environmental degradation. This report discusses a selection of such policies.

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  • Kalor, Y., M. Meder, S. Rhodes-Conway, and M. Young-Jones. Building Immigrant-Friendly Cities: A Guide for City Leaders. Mayors Innovation Project, 2018.

    As the federal government takes an increasingly hostile stance on immigration over the last 30 years, immigrant communities have become more vulnerable than ever. With the absence of a comprehensive national policy, cities must develop policies and programs to address the influx of immigrants. Municipalities across the U.S. have to address on a daily basis a myriad of issues related to immigrants, who are overwhelmingly concentrated in metropolitan areas. This report aims to help elected officials, policy-makers, activists, and community-based organizations advocate for, design, and implement progressive policies toward immigrants at the city level.

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    • Transit is a lifeline for many, and an efficient way to travel for fun and leisure. A robust transit system helps cities with a multitude of social, economic and environmental benefits.
    • Efficient, effective transit requires proactive public engagement and coordination between local government leadership, departments, and transit agencies.
    • On transit, cities can lead by example, making decisions that reduce disparities, improve air quality, and increase access to key destinations.
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  • Louis Taylor, H., G. Luter, and C. Miller. “The University, Neighborhood Revitalization, and Civic Engagement: Toward Civic Engagement 3.0”. Societies, Vol. 8, no. 4, MDPI, 2018.

    The essay explains the reasons why and concludes with a section on a more robust strategy higher education can pursue in the quest to bring about desirable change in the university neighborhood.

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  • Sundquist, E., M. Ebeling, R. Webber, C. McCahill, and S. Rhodes-Conway. Modernizing Mitigation: A Demand-Centered Approach to Reducing Car Travel. COWS, 2018.

    Traditional Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies are increasingly used by large employers and building owners to encourage the use of alternatives to driving – things like providing bus passes, bike share, and affordable carpooling. But most existing best practices overlook the role of local government decision makers, whose decisions on policy affecting local transportation options, planning and regulation of land use, structure and enforcement of fees, taxes and other financial signals can play a big role in increasing or decreasing vehicle demand.

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  • Criminalizing hard working families and falling into irrational fear harms all Wisconsin families and the Wisconsin economy. Immigrants are a core part of the Wisconsin economy and contributing to this state through taxes, education, and self-owned businesses. The state should be pursuing ways to welcome and build the skills of this community.

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  • Dresser, L. “Human Capital in Context: Policies That Shape Urban Labor Markets”. Jobs and the Labor Force of Tomorrow: Migration, Training, Education, University of Illinois Press, 2017, pp. 25-44.

    Chapter in Michael A. Pagano‘s Jobs and the Labor Force of Tomorrow: Migration, Training, Education.

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  • After an inconsistent 2016, Wisconsin started off 2017 with a modest job growth across the first quarter. January through March, the state added 12,800 jobs. The growth was concentrated in January and February and offset job losses of 3700 jobs in March. Over the quarter, private sector creation compensated for the loss of almost 7000 jobs in the public sector. Additionally, the unemployment rate continues to edge down nationally and in Wisconsin. Unemployment in Wisconsin stands now at 3.4%, significantly below the level of the end of 2016.

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2017: Facts & Figures. COWS, 2017.

    For more than two decades now, annually, on Labor Day, COWS reports on how working people are faring in the state. The State of Working Wisconsin, released biannually on even-numbered years since  1996, is our long-form report, and looks at the economy comprehensively from a working-family perspective. In odd-numbered years, also biannually, we provide a more abbreviated and focused report.

    In this year’s report, we provide our overview of some of the most critical issues facing working people in the state. The issues, taken together, are daunting – slow growth in the Wisconsin labor market, long-term stagnation in wages, extreme black/white disparity, increasing income inequality, and declining unionization. The report provides a chance to take stock of what the data say about working people in Wisconsin.

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  • The income gap between the rich and the poor remains near its highest level ever, according to this report by the Wisconsin Budget Project and COWS. The wide chasm between the very highest earners and everyone else poses hardships for Wisconsin’s families, communities, and businesses.

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  • In Wisconsin, policy makers seem to increasingly assume that work, and work alone, can provide a decent standard of living. However, working families continue to face a slew of challenges – low wages, inadequate benefits, insufficient hours – generated by the very jobs that are supposed to be the answer. This report highlights the disconnect between state policies and the realities of Wisconsin families working in jobs at or near the poverty line.

    The landscape of public support systems is changing in the state of Wisconsin, in the direction of making benefits more difficult to access for people who toil in bad jobs or cannot secure employment at all. A sharp turn toward more accessibility by redesigning the work requirements and better understanding the nature of bad jobs is needed.

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  • Wisconsin ended 2016 with 2.93 million jobs. In terms of job growth, the year was not particularly strong or consistent. Wisconsin’s December job total is just slightly above the level reached at the end of the summer. In the last quarter of 2016, the Wisconsin labor market grew by 10,500 jobs, or an average of just over 3,000 jobs per month.

    Wisconsin Job Watch: 4th Quarter 2016 Update marks a change – COWS will now provide a quarterly picture of how Wisconsin’s economy is faring.

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  • Dresser, L., M. C. King, and R. Reddy. Oregon Care Economy: The Case for Public Care Investment. COWS, 2017.

    Oregon’s current care economy is vast and largely invisible. Currently underinvested, it creates and exacerbates poverty and inequality. We are missing the opportunity to invest adequately in the care economy in order to build a stronger, more inclusive economy and better life for us all. This report seeks to bring care work into view.

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  • This report offers the story of apprenticeship innovation which is remaking apprenticeship for the new and rapidly evolving manufacturing sector.

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  • McCahill, C., and E. Sundquist. Connecting Sacramento. 2017.

    Connecting Sacramento combines location-based trip-making data from multiple sources with modern accessibility analysis to assess how they can guide transportation- and land use-related decisions around transit stations in Sacramento. Accessibility analysis lets us measure transportation performance in terms of people’s ability to reach destinations instead of simply how fast cars move or whether transit runs on time. Trip-making data, which come from smartphones, navigation devices, and GPS-enabled vehicles, let us understand people’s travel patterns and trip characteristics in detail without relying on costly travel surveys or complex travel demand models.

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  • Dredske, L., and C. McCahill. Accessibility in Practice. SSTI, Virginia Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment, 2017.

    Planning agencies and transportation decision makers often talk about the importance of improving access to destinations, but they rarely have the tools or resources to measure accessibility and incorporate those metrics into decision making. This report guides agencies through that process. The guide outlines general concepts, data needs and availability, analysis tools, and other considerations in measuring accessibility. It describes different ways accessibility can be measured and demonstrates how the metrics can be used in several specific project evaluation examples. It also briefly describes the potential use of accessibility metrics in predicting outcomes such as travel demand and transit ridership.

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  • Wisconsin has the regrettable distinction of ranking among the worst states in the nation in terms of racial equality. Various aspects of the disparity – from education to jobs and income to incarceration – have been documented consistently for more than a decade. These disparities are gaining increasing attention from activists and policy makers. Even so, and despite considerable local and statewide efforts to close these gaps, too few in Wisconsin understand the way that Wisconsin’s level of racial inequality is, in fact, dramatically more pronounced than in other states.

    Wisconsin’s Extreme Racial Disparity seeks to support and fuel the efforts of so many who are organizing, strategizing and working to close the gap.

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  • Halbert, H., and S. Herzenberg. “Job Quality in WIOA: Three Ways to Steer Investments towards High Road Jobs”. NAWDP Advantage, Vol. 29, no. 11, National Association of Workforce Development Professionals, 2016, p. 5.

    Implementation of the Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is well underway. This process creates unprecedented opportunity to adopt policies and practices that boost job quality. Connecting workers with the best quality job possible serves job seekers better. More stable work means higher income, longer job tenure, and better predictability for managing the tensions between work and life. But beyond that, WIOA policies for job quality help protect public investments in training by ensuring that those investments are not simply lost in a revolving door of turnover. Policies that focus on better quality jobs help make WIOA resources a reward for employers who are already treating their workers with greater care, rather than subsidizing low-road competitors who may waste the investment. The full report was produced by COWS, the Keystone Research Center in Pennsylvania, and Policy Matters Ohio, identifies three WIOA quality standards that can target public training investment where it will have stronger returns.

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  • Rogers, J. “Stumbling towards Stockholm”. Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 45, no. 6, 2016, pp. 703-7.

    Review of Lane Kenworthy’s Social Democratic America.

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  • Dresser, L., J. Rogers, and J. Rodriguez. State of Working Wisconsin 2016. COWS, 2016.

    The State of Working Wisconsin 2016 uses the best and recent data available on jobs and wages to describe the economic challenges that Wisconsin continues to face.

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  • Dresser, L., J. Rodriguez, and M. Meder. Wisconsin’s Child Care Workforce. COWS, 2016.

    Wisconsin’s Child Care Workforce focuses on teachers and assistant teachers working at child care centers and self-employed family child care providers throughout the state. It draws on a 2015 survey developed and conducted by the University of Wisconsin Survey Center (UWSC) and COWS. Information about child care teachers and assistant teachers was obtained through a survey of child care center directors. Information about family providers was obtained via a survey sent to these providers. The response rate for both centers and family providers was over 60 percent and the samples are representative geographically and in terms of the quality of child care in Wisconsin.

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  • In April COWS reported a dramatic job loss of more than 10,000 jobs. This month, the labor market brings better news, with increases that move us back in the right direction. Since last month, Wisconsin added 5,500 jobs. This increase was driven by private sector job growth where 9,700 jobs were added. At the same time, some 4,200 government jobs were lost between April and May. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin dropped two tenths of percentage points and stands now at 4.2%.

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  • The economy is growing again, but gains are concentrated on the state’s richest residents. As in the nation, inequality is on the rise. Over the last 40 years, Wisconsin’s richest residents have experienced dramatic increases in income, yet the rest of the state’s residents have experienced little or no income growth. The widening chasm between the very highest earners and everyone else poses hardships for Wisconsin’s families, businesses, and communities. Families can’t thrive when income growth is nearly non-existent for everyone except those at the top, and businesses need a strong middle class bolstered by broad-based income growth to generate customers. Wisconsin communities pay the price if too many families and businesses fail to prosper. Growing income inequality is also bad for Wisconsin’s economic growth. To build a solid, fast-growing economy, we need to make sure that Wisconsin has a healthy, well educated workforce. But if nearly all the gains from economic growth benefit only a few, many Wisconsin residents won’t have the resources they need to become the kind of skilled workers our economy needs for the future. That hurts everyone.

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  • Wisconsin’s dramatic March job growth was nearly erased by equally dramatic job losses in April, as the state lost nearly 13,000 jobs. The private sector lost 11,500 jobs and the public sector fell by a little more than 1,000. Manufacturing losses of 4,200 jobs were particularly severe. And in contrast to the overall decline, construction gained 3,500 jobs last month. All in all, the unemployment rate in Wisconsin dropped one tenth of a percentage point and stands now at 4.4%. Additionally, over the last year, Wisconsin’s job growth lags behind some of its Midwest neighbors: while Michigan and Indiana have grown at a pace of 2.5% and 1.6% respectively, Wisconsin has grown at a pace slower than 1.5%.

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  • Rhodes-Conway, S., M. Meder, and M. Ebeling. A Pittsburgh That Works for Working People. COWS, 2016.

    During the 20th Century, Pittsburgh was known for the steel industry and the broad middle class prosperity that was shared by many residents. Today, Pittsburgh is in the process of rebuilding its economy around new sectors, such as tech start-ups. The city has found some success in this economic transition, and the population has stabilized as highly educated tech workers move into trendy neighborhoods, but too many working people are being left behind. Residents worry about displacement from their homes and high housing costs, median income has stagnated, and racial disparities persist. The good news is that there are meaningful steps the Mayor and City Council can take to lead the city into an era of fair, inclusive, democratic and economically sustainable growth. Once again, Pittsburgh can become known for a broad middle class prosperity that is shared by many. This report provides recommendations and best practices models for how to take those steps. The vision presented in this report is one in which Pittsburgh is known as the city that rebuilt its economy into one of broadly shared prosperity and strong labor standards; with a housing market that meets the needs of long-term residents while also welcoming newcomers; that offers equitable, accessible and safe transportation choices that connect all residents to employment and other critical destinations; and that prioritizes strong community-police relations with historically marginalized communities of color and new immigrants to ensure Pittsburgh is a most livable city for all residents.

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  • Wisconsin’s labor market grew dramatically in March as nearly 16,000 jobs were added. This is a strong showing and reflect a very significant improvement in the opportunities in the state. The vast majority of new jobs were created in the private sector: private industries contributed about 15,600 jobs, while the public sector added just 300. The employment rate, which has been stable at 4.6% for a year, dropped one tenth of percentage points last month. The current unemployment rate in Wisconsin is 4.5%.

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  • Wisconsin added 7,200 jobs in February – one of the largest increases in number of jobs since October of 2015. Growth in February follows on the heels of good news in January as well (jobs up 7,200) and marks a strong start in 2016. Job growth was driven by expansion in the private sector, where 8,000 new jobs were created. (Roughly 800 government jobs were lost.) The unemployment rate held at 4.6% where it has been since mid-2015.

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  • Wisconsin’s labor market stalled at the start of 2016, losing 200 jobs according to federal data. Job losses were concentrated in the private sector with two – manufacturing (down 400 jobs) and construction (down 1000) – accounting for the entire private sector decline. Public sector growth of 1,200 jobs largely offset the private sector losses. The state’s job base is growing but only slowly. Compared to a year ago, Wisconsin has 27,000 more jobs today — growth of less than 1%. The number of jobs available now is just slightly higher than it was in December 2007, just before the Great Recession. Unemployment held steady at a 4.6%. Low unemployment rates imply greater labor market opportunity. There is some national evidence that those who had dropped out of the labor force are being tempted to rejoin it. Sustained low levels of unemployment make this dynamic more likely.

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  • Dresser, L., and M. Meder. Increasing Skills & Opportunity for Wisconsin’s Immigrants. COWS, 2016.

    Immigrants have been shaping Wisconsin’s economy since the state’s founding, and it is critical to ensure that today’s immigrants have access to the skills and education that will build shared prosperity and strengthen our economy into the future. This report provides an overview of demographic trends among the immigrant population, and addresses pressing needs with regard to citizenship, language training, and access to higher education that prevent these working families from thriving economically.

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  • , M. B. I., and S. S. T. I. “Big Data and TDM in Northern Virginia”. Northern Virginia TDM Study, Virginia Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment, 2016.

    Commercially available GPS data offers valuable new insight about trip origins, destinations, and routes, including short trips that travel demand models often cannot capture. Using this data, SSTI worked with Michael Baker International, the Virginia DOT, and local stakeholders to identify opportunities for managing travel demand and improving connectivity throughout Northern Virginia. This study also informed the early development of StreetLight Data’s Traffic Diagnostics tool.

    The final technical memo describes the full data set and 17 selected case studies, along with recommended projects and policies, estimated costs, and benefits for each.

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  • Transportation researchers and practitioners have long sought other tools to complement or perhaps replace conventional methods—tools that would better analyze trips rather than speed at points in the system, speak to non-auto modes of travel, address land use solutions as well as highway infrastructure, and so on. Barriers to such tools have included lack of data and analytic methods, as well as considerable inertia in practice.

    Fortunately, new sources of data and emerging methods, as well as new-found interest in performance and scenario planning, are yielding the types of tools that the field needs. These fall into two related but distinct categories: 1) trip-making, which looks at complete trips rather than vehicle speeds on system segments, as observed empirically rather than through models, and 2) accessibility, which describes the ease or difficulty involved in reaching destinations on the existing or planned network. The tools share the ability to inform decisions in these ways:

    • By providing area scans to assess behavior and performance,
    • By tracking behavior and performance over time,
    • By diagnosing problems,
    • By assessing solutions,
    • By engaging stakeholders with meaningful, intuitive information.

    This white paper describes SSTI’s work and experience with these tools and practices.

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  • Rogers, J. “Foreword: Federalism Bound”. Harvard Law & Policy Review, Vol. 10, no. 2, 2016, pp. 281-97.

    Essays gathered in this symposium of the Harvard Law & Policy Review consider state policy treatment of four issues of national, and even international, importance: global warming, elementary and secondary schooling, gun violence, and mass criminalization

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  • Rogers, J. “The Friedricks Threat”. The Nation, 2016.
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  • Dresser, L., H. Halbert, and S. Herzenberg. High Road WIOA: Building Higher Job Quality into Workforce Development. 2015.

    In response to the federal Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act (WIOA), most states are now in the latter stages of developing federally required plans and policies for operating their systems of workforce development under WIOA. This process creates an unprecedented opportunity to build into each state’s plan concrete ideas for using state and local workforce policy and practice to boost job quality. By developing new policies that help local boards connect workers to the best possible jobs, and supporting employers – individually and in partnerships – with efforts to improve jobs, WIOA implementation can create a “high road in workforce development.” It can make workforce systems an enduring force for better job quality.

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  • McCahill, C., N. Garrick, C. Atkinson-Palombo, and A. Polinski. Effects of Parking Provision on Automobile Use in Cities: Inferring Causality. COWS, 2015.

    Automobile use has been on the rise in cities for nearly a century and so has the supply of parking. Because driving often seems unavoidable, policymakers, developers and the public push endlessly for more parking to meet demand. That push, however, might only be making matters worse.

    This report strongly suggests that abundant parking in cities causes people to drive more, shedding important light on the question of cause and effect.

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  • The upward trend in Wisconsin continued in September. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that Wisconsin added 1,400 jobs that month. The pace of job growth in September was much slower than that established in the previous two months when Wisconsin added14,000 (in July) and 7,000 jobs (in August). Still it is good to see consistently positive numbers, even if a slow pace. In Wisconsin, eight years after the beginning of the Great Recession, the number of jobs is, at last, defintely and consistently above the pre-recession level.

    However, since the population of the state has grown steadily since the end of the recession, our labor market still has not fully recovered. If we aspire to the same level of opportunity that Wisconsin had before the recession we need to create jobs on pace with population growth. As our job market has not kept pace, Wisconsin still shows a deficit of 102,000 jobs.

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  • Dresser, L. Valuing Care by Valuing Care Workers. COWS, 2015.

    Care workers—including providers of both child care and hands-on direct care supporting the elderly and people with disabilities—number 5.5 million and are employed in some of the fastest growing and lowest paying jobs in the American economy. Their “priceless” work, of such critical importance to families and society, rarely offers more than miserable wages and shoddy benefits. Improving these jobs and securing a decent standard of care requires fundamentally and dramatically reshaping the nation’s understanding of what care work is, what it is worth, and how to pay for it.

    This paper is released as part of the Roosevelt Institute’s larger report, Blueprint to Empower Workers to Shared Prosperity.

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  • Rogers, J. To Support Wisconsin’s Middle Class, Change Our State Government. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2015, pp. 1-2J.
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  • Wisconsin’s unsteady labor market finally added jobs in July which offers good news in the face of the decline in jobs since March. In June, Wisconsin had the same number of jobs that it had at the beginning of the 2015 which was also and finally the same as number the state had before the recession began (December 2007). Over the last two months of summer, July and August 2015, some 20,000 jobs were added in the state. Wisconsin is now solidly above pre-recession levels, and also hopefully on a consistently positive job growth path as well. It is good news that Wisconsin’s labor market is finally larger than it was nearly 8 years ago. Still, the potential labor force in the state is much larger than it was in the past, and the jobs we have today are not sufficient to keep up with our population growth. As Figure and Table 1 make clear, Wisconsin still faces a significant jobs deficit and needs stronger growth to fill that gap. In order to simply provide the same opportunity that we had in 2007, Wisconsin’s “jobs deficit” now stands at around 102,000 jobs.

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  • This report analyzes paid family leave insurance could look like in Wisconsin. Paid leave insurance allows workers to take short-term paid leave in order to care for their families without fear of losing their jobs or significant loss of income. This is a policy that helps workers balance both work and family, and programs are already well established in California and New Jersey. Building off the experience in those two states, we estimate utilization and financing for a Paid Leave Insurance program for the state. Such a program would likely grow to support some 100,000 working Wisconsinites each year and could be supported by a premium on wages of 0.4 percent.

    Paid leave is especially critical for the nearly three-in-ten working families in the state who have low income (below twice the poverty line) in spite of their strong commitment to work. For these families, sick and vacation leave is stingy or nonexistent, reliable day care for children or adults is prohibitively expensive, and workers themselves are more likely to have health challenges.
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  • Dresser, L., S. Fu, J. Rodriguez, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2015: Facts & Figures. COWS, 2015.

    Over Labor Day weekend, COWS released The State of Working Wisconsin 2015 Facts & Figures, an overview of the critical issues facing working people in the state. From the perspective of working Wisconsin, the news this weekend is not good. Wisconsin faces slow growth, extreme racial disparity in unemployment, long-term stagnation in wages, and one-fourth of workers struggling in poverty-wage jobs.

    Since 1996, COWS has released The State of Working Wisconsin every two years on Labor Day. It provides use the best and most recent data available to help build a comprehensive understanding of how working people in the state are doing. The full report comes out in even years. In odd years, like this one, 2015, the report is abbreviated and more focused.

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  • After a very dramatic loss in the number of jobs in the month of May, June brings slightly better news for the state of Wisconsin. In June, the state added 1,900 new jobs. On net, however, the Wisconsin job market of 2015 has been largely stagnant. Last month, in the middle of the year, Wisconsin posted 2,882,000 jobs, a number only slightly higher than the state’s January count. And, in fact, the number is just barely higher than the number of jobs Wisconsin had when the recession began over seven years ago. And because the population of the state has grown over those years, Wisconsin remains substantially short of the number of jobs needed to keep opportunity in line with 2007 levels. The Wisconsin “jobs deficit” still stands at 115,700. At the current rate of growth, it would take Wisconsin another 5 years to fill our jobs hole.

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  • Rhodes-Conway, S., P. Bailon, S. Munger, and C. Reynolds. A District That Works: Policies to Promote Equity and Job Quality in Our Nation’s Capital. COWS, 2015.

    The District of Columbia is going through a period of great transformation. While it has successfully strengthened its fiscal health and its economy and population have grown, its prosperity has not been evenly distributed. However, it is not too late for the District to adopt measures that strengthen low income communities and communities of color and push back against the trend of growing inequality. The new administration has a fresh opportunity to tackle these challenges. It will be essential that key leaders in the administration are driven by a strong vision for how to make the District work for all of its residents.

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Knauss. The US Child Care Industry. COWS, 2015.

    The purpose of this report is to provide an accessible overview of child care with a special focus on the child care workforce in the United States in 2014. The broad questions that guide this document are:

    • What does the industry “look like”? What does this mean for workers in child care?
    • How has it changed and not changed over recent decades? And how have the skills and pay of workers changed, or not?
    • What are the strongest ways to enhance workers’ skills and wages building around an agenda of quality care and quality jobs for the future in child care?
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  • For Wisconsin workers and employers to thrive in the 21st Century, this critical progress in skills and talent infrastructure must be supported, connected, amplified and extended. Wisconsin is a national leader – in career pathways, in tech college training for displaced and other workers, and in industry/employer driven training investments in the “Fast Forward” grant program for demand-driven training). This infrastructure can help connect the unemployed to work, the underemployed to the skills they need to move toward self-sufficiency, and the state’s employers to relevant strategies for developing their own workers’ skills as well. This infrastructure is critical for advancing Wisconsin’s competitive position and for providing low-wage workers a stronger pathway to self-sustaining jobs.
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  • In 2013, Wisconsin launched Fast Forward, a $15 million state investment in demand driven worker training. By mid-December 2014, the Wisconsin Fast Forward (WFF) worker training program planned to distribute approximately $10.4 million in worker training grants and was preparing to announce additional grants for the remaining nearly $3.6 million. Fast Forward is an unprecedented investment in Wisconsin and skills. It is an exciting step forward to build the skills that both workers and employers need in this state. Direct employer engagement in all stages of the WFF process helps ensure the relevance of the skills training delivered.
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  • McCahill, C., and S. Rhodes-Conway. Urban Parking: Rational Policy Approaches for Cities and Towns. COWS, 2015.

    Parking has been a contentious policy focus in cities and towns around the United States for decades. Residents, visitors, and business owners often lament what they see as parking shortages or unfair prices. Meanwhile, surface lots and parking garages have chipped away at once vibrant urban centers, taking up what is often the most valuable land in the region. Undoubtedly, parking is an important asset to many American cities and, as such, should be viewed as an integral piece of the each city’s transportation and land use system. However, like any land use or any piece of transportation infrastructure, it must be managed properly to ensure it works efficiently and adds value to the community. City officials can accomplish this by leveraging municipally owned parking—both on-street and off—and by regulating and taxing privately owned parking.

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  • Across the country, Healthcare Training Funds – joint programs of labor and management, bargained and administered at the local and regional level – have developed an impressive and growing core of work. From a core of SEIU locals and employers, mostly from the hospital sector, H-CAP and the related H-CAP Education Association (EA), have convened a network that has grown into a force with reach, experience, and impact not conceived of when the project began. The participating partnerships and training funds/organizations in aggregate now reach 900 healthcare providers in every setting of healthcare – from home health, to long term care, to clinics and hospitals – and nearly 600,000 workers from every occupational level in the healthcare industry. This paper provides an introduction to one of workforce development’s most innovative programs across the nation.

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  • Rogers, J. Productive Democracy. Vol. 400, The Nation, 2015, pp. 206-10.

    From The Nation‘s 150th Anniversary Issue, April 6, 2015.

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  • Wisconsin’s growth and prosperity are not being widely shared. Over the last 40 years, Wisconsin’s richest residents have experienced dramatic increases in income, while Wisconsinites not among the very highest earners saw little or no income growth. In 2012, Wisconsin reached a milestone, with a record share of income going to the top 1%.

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  • Jobs data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show an increase of 16,000 jobs in Wisconsin this past month. While statistics are subject to monthly revisions, and the exact figure might change, this substantial increase is significant and likely to remain the best month for job growth of 2015. This increase in jobs is very good news for the Badger State which has been on a weak trajectory since the recovery began. Wisconsin now is firmly and consistently posting a job count well in excess of the number of jobs the state had on the eve of the Great Recession (December 2007).

    Because the population has grown since the Great Recession, just getting back to the 2007 job base doesn’t provide the same sense of opportunity, however. For the labor market to provide the same level of opportunity for our current population, the state job market is still 95,000 jobs short. In fact, even if this strong rate of job growth were maintained –a difficult feat in itself–the state is still half a year from recovering to the level of opportunity in 2007.

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  • Ebeling, M., B. Forman, R. Parr, and M. Aki. Going for Growth: Enhancing the Economic Impact of Public Transit in Gateway Cities With Comprehensive Service Planning. MassINC Gateway Cities Innovation Institute, 2014.

    From the Gateway Cities Innovation Institute, in collaboration with State Smart Transportation Initiative, this report examines how best practices in transit planning can benefit Massachusetts’s Regional Transit Authorities.

    As part of 2013’s landmark transportation finance legislation, the state legislature mandated that the RTAs conduct comprehensive service plans. If done well, the report argues, these assessments could help make the case for more funding from the state going forward.

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  • Nearly one in four Boston families lives in poverty and incomes in the Greater Boston area are more unequally distributed than in the vast majority of other metro areas around the country. The good news is that the City has a number of important tools that can be engaged to address these problems. However, in order to maximize its effectiveness, the City will have to re-focus and re-organize its approach to economic development. Critically, the City must make combatting poverty and inequality a core priority in all of its programs. Moreover, the City should adopt a broader and more proactive vision of economic development and reorganize programs and structures accordingly. This COWS report, co-written with SEIU 32BJ, identifies five key ways in which the City can re-focus and re-organize its programs and provides a number of specific recommendations of steps the City should take.
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  • This report is one of several designed to help Government/Municipal, University, School and Hospital (M.U.S.H.) entities implement energy efficiency upgrades of their building stock. For a comprehensive look at the sector, see Making M.U.S.H. Energy Efficient.

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  • Holloway, B., S. Rhodes-Conway, and C. Spahr. Urban Freight Transportation: Low Cost Measures to Reduce Negative Impacts. COWS, 2014.

    Freight transportation is a critical element of both national and local economies. Yet, it creates a number of challenges for cities due to congestion, emissions, crashes, noise and other factors. This report provides cities with low cost policy-driven measures to reduce the negative impacts of freight transportation.

    Increasing the efficiency of freight movement and addressing the social costs and environmental justice issues of freight transportation are not mutually exclusive. The strategies identified in this report can help cities meet their transportation challenges in the years ahead while promoting just, healthy, and sustainable freight practices.

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  • Jenkins, C., A. Schepker, and S. Rhodes-Conway. Local Food and Economic Development: A Guide for Local Governments. COWS, 2014.

    This Mayors Innovation Project report is a complement to Promoting Access to Healthy, Local Food.

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  • , C., and W. B. P. Pulling Apart: Focus on Wisconsin’s 1 Percent. COWS, 2014.

    Income inequality continues to grow in Wisconsin and the United States, producing an ever-widening chasm between the rich and poor. Over the last 40 years, Wisconsin’s richest residents have experienced dramatic increases in income, while Wisconsinites not among the very highest earners saw their incomes stagnate or decline.

    Wisconsin’s growth and prosperity are not being equally shared. The rewards of prosperity have been concentrated on the richest 1%. As a state, this should be of substantial concern, not only because of the slow or non-existent growth in incomes for the remaining 99% percent of families, but also because increasing disparity comes with substantial social costs.

    All data in this report comes from The Increasingly Unequal States of America: Income Inequality by State, 1917 to 2011. Income figures are presented in 2011 dollars.

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  • This report analyzes the economic impact of a minimum wage increase to $10.10 per hour for Wisconsin workers. Increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016 would increase wages for over half a million Wisconsin workers. Additionally, as parents see wages go up, some 234,000 Wisconsin children will see family income rise as a result. Of the 587,000 Wisconsin workers who would be affected by raising the wage to $10.10, 57 percent are women, 79 percent of workers are 20 years old or older, 47 percent of workers have at least some college education, 42 percent of workers work more than 35 hours per week, nearly two-thirds (64 percent) are in families with income under than $60,000.

    Additionally, the report addresses the claim that increasing the minimum wage destroys jobs. Over the last twenty years, numerous studies have confirmed that minimum wage increases do not reduce overall employment levels. A letter signed by nearly 600 economists, including seven Nobel prize winners and eight past presidents of the American Economic Association, states that “the weight of evidence now [shows] that increases in the minimum wage have had little or no negative effect on the employment of minimum-wage workers, even during times of weakness in the labor market.”

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  • Rogers, J., and S. Rhodes-Conway. Cities at Work: Progressive Local Policies to Rebuild the Middle Class. COWS, 2014.

    This 2014 report is based on the practical experience and struggle of elected officials and advocates from around the country in moving their communities onto the “high road” of shared prosperity, environmental sustainability, and efficient democratic government. Its goal is to arm progressive local elected leaders and advocates with a range of effective policies that, if adopted, would make a significant difference in getting on that high road. They will be able to use better democratic organization to add value, reduce waste, and capture and share locally the great benefits of doing both.

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  • Ebeling, M. Re-Thinking the Urban Freeway. SSTI and Mayors Innovation Project, 2014.

    Across the country, urban freeways are at the end of their design lives, and cities are wrestling with the question of how to deal with them. Cities have the opportunity to rethink, remove, or repurpose urban freeway space, which can address environmental and social justice harm and result in significant local economic and social benefits. Re-Thinking the Urban Freeway provides cities with best practices and solutions from across the country, to help cities mitigate negative freeway impacts and secure a healthy and more prosperous future.

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  • Vital Signs 2014 is a regional economic review for the Incourage Community Foundation. This economic analysis summarizes the most recent data to help focus discussions and decision-making on economic growth and opportunity in South Wood County. From schools to employers, wages to social supports, and employment to homelessness, COWS offers data that provides a shared understanding of where South Wood County is, and where it can improve.

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  • This guide frames a broad public-private conversation on climate resiliency, community health, and economic inclusiveness. Developed by COWS in partnership with the American Association of Community Colleges’ Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) Center, Climate Resiliency & The Community College defines climate resilience and its implications for jobs and training; outlines emerging opportunities to engage in related work; and lifts up examples of innovation and best practice across a variety of economic sectors, including health, energy, water, and emergency response.

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  • Chenven, L., and L. Dresser. Turn up the HEET!. COWS, 2014.
    Between 2008-2014, Washington State has invested more than $11 million dollars in Hospital Employee Education and Training (HEET) projects to advance health care workers’ careers. This report takes a step back from the day-to-day operation and programs and take a broader view of HEET. With the perspective provided by multiple projects and partners on the ground, HEET adds up to much more than a simple count of students trained. At its core, the innovation of HEET is the partnership of labor, management, and education. Most of the impressive educational and student support strategies that have come from HEET are generated, forged, leveraged, and supported in that partnership. HEET has profoundly transformed workers lives. HEET has transformed systems as well, with innovations cascading out to change education and workforce development throughout the state. This report takes stock of the overall meaning and impact of six years of HEET based on review of existing annual evaluations and retrospective interviews with dozens of leaders, stakeholders, and implementers of HEET projects.
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  • , E., M. Cociña, L. Dresser, and J. Knauss. Raise the Floor Wisconsin - Minimum Wage Edition. COWS, 2014.

    There is a crisis of poverty-wage work in Wisconsin. 700,000 Wisconsinites, one of every four workers in the state, earns less than $11.36 per hour – the wage required for a full-time, full-year worker to keep a family of four out of poverty – according to a new report from COWS and the Economic Policy Institute (EPI).

    The report helps draw a more complete picture of poverty-wage work in Wisconsin, using federal data to highlight problems in the labor market, the workers that stands to gain from a higher minimum wage, the jobs these workers hold, and the real costs of living that Wisconsinites face. The report also challenges the argument that raising the minimum wage is bad for business.

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  • Raising the Quality of Childcare looks at three projects.

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  • Dresser, L. State of Working Wisconsin 2014. COWS, 2014.

    The State of Working Wisconsin 2014 uses the best and recent data available on jobs and wages to describe the serious economic challenges that Wisconsin continues to face.

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  • At the May 2013 SSTI Community of Practice, participants requested guidance on performance measures for biking and walking projects. After surveying state DOTs, city and MPO staff, national organizations, and the research literature, this draft report outlines strategies used to assess the success of state and local projects. The narrative document examines metrics currently being used as well as the drawbacks or challenges to using each one. A matrix also summarizes the pros and cons and expense or difficulty of gathering the data needed.

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  • Massachusetts’s Regional Transit Authorities have an opportunity to improve their existing service and make the case for more funding from the state by making the most of a new planning requirement from the legislature. As part of 2013’s landmark transportation finance legislation, the state legislature mandated that the RTAs conduct comprehensive service plans. This paper argues that if done well, these assessments could help make the case for more funding from the state going forward.

    This policy brief, released by MassINC’s Gateway Cities Innovation Institute in collaboration with the SSTI is the sixth in MassINC’s Going for Growth series, compares Massachusetts to best practices in regional transit planning from across the country.

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  • Rogers, J. The Right’s Kill Shot. Vol. 298, The Nation, 2014, pp. 4-6.

    Harris v. Quinn has the highest stakes for labor in April 14, 2014, The Nation.

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  • The reinvigoration of manufacturing presents Milwaukee with a real opportunity. And the manufacturing opportunity could provide an answer to some of the city’s most ruinous problems, especially the economic isolation of the central city population. Manufacturing Better Opportunity & A Stronger Economy provides key data on manufacturing in Milwaukee and the problems which the central city community confronts. Additionally, it discusses the work that the Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership/BIG STEP has done and will continue doing in order to build a stronger bridge from community to manufacturers throughout the region.

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  • This report synthesizes key information on the health care workforce in South Central/Southwest Wisconsin. We provide a snapshot of the current workforce in 40 selected health care occupations based on a representative subset of area employers surveyed in Spring 2013. We also project near-term changes in that workforce based on future retirements and employers’ anticipated staffing needs. Comparing the 2013 results to those of a nearly identical employer survey in 2008 allows us to assess key changes and continuities in the region’s health care workforce over the last five years, and to gauge the accuracy of the 2008 predictions.

    Across all occupations considered, the health care workforce in the region has expanded considerably over the last five years. This expansion was perhaps expected given the region’s aging population and their associated health care needs. Less expected was the precision of the 2008 projections across all occupations, given the economic turbulence of the last five years: employers predicted an overall workforce growth of eight percent between 2008 and 2013, and this is precisely what happened. Workers in 2013 were also slightly older than in 2008, a trend that may be driven in part by the Great Recession and the need by some workers to postpone retirement.

    Document includes Executive Summary.

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  • 2013 Healthcare Staffing Assessment – Nursing and Pharmacy

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  • The health, wealth, infrastructure and ability to maintain basic services of cities will increasingly be degraded as our planet warms and our weather worsens. Yet local governments are currently sharing in the profits made by the fossil fuel industry – investing in the very companies that are directly responsible for this threat. The Mayors Innovation Project, a COWS project, is working to support the local government fossil fuel divestment movement. Building on the example set by Mayor McGinn of Seattle, we’re working with cities to remove municipal funds from fossil fuel investments, and working with pension funds to do the same. Divestment can have a serious impact and send an important message, and this guide offers the tools to help you get started on a divestment campaign in your community.

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  • This study from the State Smart Transportation Initiative – a COWS project – seeks to make recommendations for improving current system operations and to point out directions that can help position DART to function as an integral part of the city’s and region’s transportation system. Wilmington functions as the hub of DART (Delaware’s bus system) in New Castle County, providing over 10 million passenger trips a year—including us and demand response paratransit. Thirty-eight of DART’s 60 routes serve Wilmington. Within the City of Wilmington, DART ridership continues to grow, resulting in bus congestion in the city’s central business district (CBD), particularly around and adjacent to Rodney Square. This success illustrates DCT’s role as an increasingly important part of the economic engine of the city. DCT contributes positively to the overall economic vibrancy of Wilmington through the movement of people, increased accessibility to the transportation system, improvements in air quality, and provision of access to jobs, medical care, and commercial centers. Document include Full Report and Executive Summary.

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  • The national recovery has been weak. And in Wisconsin, the recovery has lagged behind even the meager pace posted nationally. This Labor Day, COWS has released The State of Working Wisconsin Update 2013, which shows just how much the Wisconsin economy has lagged behind the national pace and the sectors that account for the Wisconsin difference.

    We find that Wisconsin would have 33,000 more jobs today if we’d only kept on pace with the national recovery. Since the Wisconsin economy began to grew, we’ve added 99,000 jobs. If Wisconsin had tracked the national recovery, the economy would have added 132,000 jobs. That difference, 33,000 jobs, is a measure of the how Wisconsin lags behind the national trend. To be sure, even that national trend is too weak. But in Wisconsin, we should have 33,000 more jobs today than we do.

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  • COWS produced Vital Signs 2013, a regional economic review for the Incourage Community Foundation. This economic analysis summarizes the most recent data to help focus discussions and decision-making on economic growth and opportunity in South Wood County. From schools to employers, wages to social supports, and employment to homelessness, COWS offers data that provides a shared understanding of where South Wood County is, and where it can improve.

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  • Dresser, L. Raise the Floor Milwaukee. COWS, 2013.

    This report highlights how raising the low-wage floor will improve quality of life for the 100,000 workers in poverty-wage jobs in the city, and for a roughly equal number of poverty-wage workers in the suburban counties around city. Long term decline was made more brutal by the Great Recession, leaving workers at the mercy of a dramatic shift from manufacturing into services, declining unionization, and falling job quality. Evidence of the economic crisis abounds, yet Milwaukee’s problems — including racial disparity and residential segregation, child poverty, crime and incarceration, catastrophic drop-out rates, especially for African Americans and Hispanics — are not inevitable. They result from increasing economic isolation of the central city and increasingly isolation even of the middle of the labor market from meaningful effects of growth.

     

    Full Report              Executive Summary

  • This report summarizes the accomplishments of and lessons learned from the Wisconsin Industry Partnerships (IP) initiative (2008–2012), a project directing state investment of more than six million dollars in concert with dozens of participating employers in order to increase the skills of over 6000 workers in the state. Wisconsin’s IP experience is especially relevant today as leaders turn their attention to building the skills of the state’s workforce.

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  • This report highlights the best of recently proposed investments in the state’s workforce and offers ideas on how to maximize them to promote economic competitiveness — namely, by building on Wisconsin’s nationally acclaimed efforts to forge a more functional labor market through career pathways and industry partnerships. Specifically, we offer our recommendations on key workforce investments in the biennial budget proposal and “Fast Forward” legislation that can advance business and family prosperity in Wisconsin.

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  • Cleveland, J. Opportunities to Advance the Building Energy Efficiency Market in the Health Care Sector. COWS and Innovation Network for Communities, 2013.

    This report presents recommendations on potential high impact philanthropic investments to advance deep building energy efficiency improvements at scale within the healthcare sector. It is one of five reports being developed for a coalition of six philanthropies that are collaborating to see what they – and others – might do to rapidly increase and scale the energy efficiency retrofit market for buildings in the United States. These philanthropies are the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Energy Foundation, Kresge Foundation, Living Cities, MacArthur Foundation and Rockefeller Foundation. The other sectors for which market development strategies are being developed include: commercial office, commercial retail, single-family residential, and multifamily residential.

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  • Wisconsin has the regrettable distinction of ranking among the worst states in the nation in terms of racial equality. Various aspects of the disparity – from education to jobs and income to incarceration – have been documented consistently for more than a decade. This report pulls together a range of data from public sources to make the racial disparities in the state clear. Brutal inequities in the state span measures of poverty, unemployment, educational attainment, and incarceration.

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  • The Living Wage Ordinance for Milwaukee County would establish a floor on wages of $12.45 per hour for the work done in support of the public priorities achieved through county contracts, leases, and concessions. Using the best estimates of covered workers available, COWS simulates the impact of the $12.45 living wage on covered workers.

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  • Across the country, urban freeways are at the end of their design lives, and cities are wrestling with the question of how to deal with them. Cities have the opportunity to rethink, remove, or repurpose urban freeway space, which can address environmental and social justice harm and result in significant local economic and social benefits.

    Rehinking the Urban Freeway
     provides cities with best practices and solutions from across the country, to help cities mitigate negative freeway impacts and secure a healthy and more prosperous future.
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  • Rogers, J. Alternatives to Capitalism: Using State and Local Policies. Vol. 22, no. 1, Penn State, 2013, pp. 91-109.

    Articles in The Good Society respond to the premise that “current versions of socialism and democratic capitalism fail to offer workable visions of a good society and seem increasingly to contradict such basic values as liberty, democracy, equality, and environmental sustainability.” The journal publishes outstanding dialectical articles on the pressing political, social, religious, and legal questions facing twenty-first-century society and aims to “create a theoretical basis for the eventual restructuring of real world political-economic systems.”

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  • ,. COWS Program Overview. COWS, 2013.

    Since our founding more than twenty years ago, COWS has promoted “high road” solutions to social problems. These treat equity, sustainability, and capable democratic organization as necessary and achievable complements in human development, not tragic tradeoffs. They use better democratic organization to increase the productivity of places and to capture and share the benefits of doing so, treating democracy not only as a source of voice and equity, but wealth generation.

    COWS’ commitment to building the high road now, and feeding the movement to build it everywhere, is what unites what might otherwise seem disconnected projects — from designing innovative energy-efficiency programs for neighborhoods and cities; to promoting industry partnerships in metropolitan regions; to convening public and private stakeholders on solving energy, transportation, or water issues; to working with state and local elected officials and public interest advocates on a range of other problems and opportunities. In this program overview, we summarize essential elements of this work.
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  • Living wage ordinances are enacted by local governments to raise job standards for workers at firms that do business with a city or county, or that benefit from taxpayer assistance. At least 140 communities in the U.S. have passed such laws over the past two decades, and there is now a significant body of research on their effect. The evidence shows that living wage ordinances raise wages for low-income workers, often by a significant amount, with few if any measurable negative effects on either employment or taxes. Any government considering a living wage ordinance of its own should consider the track record of living wage laws in other communities in order to implement the best living wage law possible.

    Document includes Executive Summary.

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  • Holloway, B., and C. Spahr. Getting the Goods Withouth the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts. National Center for Freight & Infrastructure Research & Education (CFIRE), 2013.

    SSTI project, with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE),  identifies and evaluates freight transportation demand management (TDM) strategies to improve transportation efficiency by reducing the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas.

    Information about various freight transportation demand management (TDM) strategies was gathered through a review of literature, an online survey, and interviews with implementers. Strategies are compared based on their costs, benefits, and implementation difficulty. Case studies of six US cities using innovative freight TDM strategies are also included.

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  • To gain a better understanding of the post-secondary education needs in each state, we – together with CLASP – developed profiles of adult workers in every state who are in need of better skills and wages. Click here to learn more about your state.

  • Frankel, E., P. Lewis, M. Maggiore, J. Schank, P. Shepherd, E. Sundquist, B. Taylor, and D. Williams. Evaluating Potential Performance Measures for Congestion and Systems Performance. 2013.

    In a joint effort with the Bipartisan Policy Center and SSTI, the Eno Center for Transportation held a daylong meeting June 20 to discuss federal performance measures for highways. Under MAP-21, the U.S. DOT was required to create and implement a number of performance measures to help guide and monitor federal transportation spending. The workshop brought together a number of experienced experts as well as officials directly involved in and affected by the upcoming ruling.

    This report is the result the meeting and summarizes the recommendations based on the workshop discussion and previous research, and includes recommended measures of congestion and system performance as well as additional considerations for their successful implementation. These recommendations integrate the performance measures currently in development or in use by workshop participants as well as the perspectives of participants related to these measures and their value to national, state, and regional interests.

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  • This project, funded by SSTI with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE),  identifies and evaluates freight transportation demand management (TDM) strategies to improve transportation efficiency by reducing the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas.

    Information about various freight transportation demand management strategies was gathered through a review of literature, an online survey, and interviews with implementers. Strategies are compared based on their costs, benefits, and implementation difficulty. Case studies of six US cities using innovative freight TDM strategies are also included.

    The table below details the impacts and implementation difficulty of various freight TDM strategies.

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  • McCahill, C., and C. Spahr. VMT Inflection Point: Factors Affecting 21st Century Travel. SSTI, 2013.

    For many decades, transportation planning has assumed continued increases in automobile use. Now, in a major reversal, the average American is driving considerably less. According to the most recent FHWA travel-volume report for July, total vehicle miles traveled showed no increase compared to the previous 12-month period, marking more than five years of no growth. No one can predict the future with certainty, but there are many reasons to think that VMT trends will not revert to the 20th century trend. This paper lists some of those reasons, with references to supporting literature.

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  • Mackey, M., and S. Peterson. Workforce Central Evaluation. COWS, 2012.

    Workforce Central is a strategic effort to address the growing workforce and economic challenges facing the community. Key components of their strategy focuses on developing adaptive leadership skills, shifting attitudes, and engaging leaders to work across boundaries.

    This independent, local evaluation of its workforce development efforts is commissioned by Incourage Community Foundation’s Workforce Central initiative. This evaluation uses quantitative and qualitative indicators to assess progress towards achieving Workforce Central’s goals and “Ultimate Outcome.”

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  • Wisconsin Jobs and Low-Income Working Families looks at the one in four working families in Wisconsin who struggle to get by as well as the tens of thousands of workers whose jobs provide low wages and few benefits. The report was produced by COWS as part of the Working Poor Families Project.

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  • The mission of Colorado’s Energy Smart Transportation Initiative was to develop a framework for considering energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in transportation decision-making. With SSTI assistance, a collaborative team composed of federal and state agencies, MPOs, and rural planning partners came together to leverage resources and promote efficiency and effectiveness among agencies by exploring ways to develop “energy smart transportation” strategies. This report includes strategies developed to incorporate energy efficiency and GHG emissions in transportation planning, increase energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions from transportation, advance environmentally friendly alternative vehicle and fuel technologies, and increase efficiency through truck fleet enhancements, improved traveler information, and other methods.

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  • According to a new report by COWS and the Wisconsin Budget Project, the income disparity between Wisconsin’s richest and poorest families continues to widen. This analysis of Wisconsin Department of Revenue data finds that Wisconsin’s richest residents have experienced dramatic increases in inflation-adjusted income since the mid-1990s, while middle- and lower-income Wisconsinites saw their incomes stagnate or decrease.

    Between 1996 and 2010, the bottom 40 percent of Wisconsin earners experienced an average decrease of $2,407 in their adjusted gross income, measured in 2012 dollars. The top fifth of income tax filers saw an increase in earnings of more than $17,000 over this period.

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  • Jenkins, C., and S. Rhodes-Conway. Promoting Access to Healthy, Local Food: A Guide for Local Governments. COWS, 2012.

    Within cities, residents face stark disparities in their access to fresh, healthy produce, with low-income communities often the most affected by this limited access. Inequitable access to food perpetuates poor health outcomes among low-income populations and undermines efforts to improve public health and promote community. The increase in diet-related diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers have put us on a path to change modern history: many children born today will have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. In addition to nutritional and health impacts, the flow of food dollars out of some regions represents a significant loss for local economies. Our small farmers have been pushed to the limit of their livelihood.

    This report by COWS’ Mayors Innovation Project looks at bright spots of innovation, where local policies promote and increase residents’ access to healthy food. While there is no single solution to address the problem of unequal access to affordable, healthy food, there are a range policy strategies that can help develop local food capacities, enhance public health, and improve urban economies.

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  • With DOT budget shortfalls growing, traditional means of delivering transportation services no longer meet today’s needs, and they are incapable of launching tomorrow’s economy.

    While change is daunting, it is both essential and possible—as those who have done it can attest. States and their DOTs are improving services in the short term and planning effectively for the long term. They have adopted innovative yet pragmatic policy reforms, and are reevaluating and retooling traditional practices. Their success offers a path forward for others.

    COWS’ State Smart Transportation Initiative (SSTI) has teamed up with Smart Growth America to create a resource to inform senior state-level transportation officials as they make decisions that position their agencies for success. This handbook of transportation policy and practice for the new economy collects the innovative approaches state leaders are already using to make systems more efficient, government more effective, and constituents better satisfied.

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  • Dresser, L., J. Rogers, and S. White. Greener Reality: Jobs, Skills, and Equity in a Cleaner U.S. Economy. COWS, 2012.

    Greener Reality takes stock of the green economy, looking at what works (and doesn’t) in related skill and credentialing initiatives and placing them in a broader context of human capital development, community resilience, and climate change. Defining equity, sustainability, and greater democratization as critical elements of a truly greener future, the paper considers the practical and political challenges to achieving these in the United States. This report builds on our earlier work in Greener Pathways and Greener Skills. Documents include Full Report and Executive Summary.

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  • Cociña, M., L. Dresser, E. Navot, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2012. COWS, 2012.

    The ninth edition of COWS’ biennial report, The State of Working Wisconsin 2012uses the best and most recent data available to refine our understanding of exactly how working people in Wisconsin are doing. This year’s Labor Day report finds too many workers in Wisconsin waiting for an economic recovery strong enough to produce jobs, higher family income, and a growing sense of security.

    For the first time this year, COWS is also including an online supplement to the print version. The supplement provides more maps, more data, and interactive graphs on key economic and social indicators at the state and county level. The online supplement will be updated as new data becomes available and will provide access to figures and graphs on the Wisconsin economy as they come out.

    Documents include Full Report, Executive Summary and a technical note that compares the CES and QCEW, two key sources of data on employment that have caused some recent controversy.

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  • Mackey, M., S. Peterson, and J. Topp. Vital Signs: Measuring the Vitality of the South Wood County Area. COWS, 2012.

    COWS developed Vital Signs, a regional economic review for the Incourage Community Foundation. This economic analysis summarizes the most recent data to help focus discussions and decision-making on economic opportunity in the South Wood County Area. From schools to employers, wages to social supports, and employment to homelessness, COWS offers data that builds a picture of where South Wood County is, and where it needs to improve.

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  • This report details the discrepancy between Wisconsin’s current job numbers and those Wisconsin would have achieved had it mirrored national trends.

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  • This fact sheet from COWS and the Wisconsin Women’s Council, released in honor of National Pay Equity Day, shows that despite the growing importance of women’s contribution to the labor force and to household incomes, the gender wage gap stubbornly persists irrespective of age, race, or level of education. In 2010, Wisconsin women earned, on average, only 77.8 cents for every dollar earned by men.

    The Wisconsin gap, while significant, is slightly smaller than in 2009 when women earned just 75 cents for each dollar earned by men. Nationally, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research has reported that the decline in the wage gap is mostly due to falling wages for men.

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  • Toward College Success for Working Adults provides a clearer picture of the educational trajectory of low-skill adults in the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS). The analysis presents statewide results from a pipeline data study on transition rates, enrollment, and diploma and degree completion for adults accessing a wide variety of basic skills and postsecondary courses and programs at WTCS. This knowledge can help colleges design programs and services that turn more workers into successful college graduates.

    Documents include Full Report and Executive Summary.

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  • , S. S. Building Public Support to Fund Preservation Work. SSTI and Iowa DOT, 2012.

    The Iowa Department of Transportation asked SSTI for assistance building public support for a gas tax increase to fund critical repair and maintenance work. SSTI contracted with Spitfire Strategies, a strategic communications firm that works exclusively with nonprofits and foundations, to help Iowa craft effective messaging that would resonate with policymakers and key stakeholders.

    Based on SSTI and Spitfire’s work in Iowa and recent polling, this paper outlines how transportation professionals can gain support for a “fix-it-first” approach to transportation policy. It highlights messages and tactics that have effectively garnered voter and policymaker support and presents lessons learned from the Iowa Department of Transportation.

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. “Wisconsin One Year Later: What Happened, What Is Happening, and What It Means for Progressives”. Social Policy , Vol. 1, 2012, pp. 4-11.
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  • Rogers, J. “Productive Democracy”. Renewing Democratic Deliberation in Europe, The Challenge of Social and Civil Dialogue, Peter Lang, 2012, pp. 71-92.
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  • Biehler, A., S. Burrington, M. D. Meyer, D. Foy, A. Glynn, E. Partridge, and E. Sundquist. Review of Washington State DOT’s Sustainability Efforts.

    This review was performed at the request of Washington State DOT (WSDOT) to assess its sustainability efforts. SSTI convened a panel of experts that included people who have led transformative initiatives as heads of state DOTs. The panel combined practical and academic thinking. The expert panel reviewed background materials on WSDOT’s efforts and then interviewed stakeholders with varying perspectives on WSDOT’s work, including WSDOT staff; personnel from other state, federal, and local entities; and representatives from the not-for-profit sector. Intended as a peer review rather than an audit, the expert panel members brought their knowledge of transportation policy and trends to bear in assessing where WSDOT has succeeded and how its sustainability efforts could be strengthened.

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  • Irwin, J., S. L. White, S. Rhodes-Conway, and J. Rogers. Making M.U.S.H. Energy Efficient. COWS, 2011.

    Retrofitting the nation’s public and institutional buildings for greater energy efficiency, financing these retrofits from the savings achieved, and requiring local-hire and job and advancement standards for those who do the work can provide the widespread high-road job creation needed in today’s economy. Publicly controlled buildings are an obvious place to focus for a number of reasons. This report discusses the financial structures that can be used, the barriers to doing this work, and the policies needed to overcome these barriers and create high-road jobs. The report is part of the Big Ideas for Job Creation in a Jobless Recovery project funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and organized by the UC-Berkeley Institute for Research on Labor and Unemployment.

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  • Developed by COWS for Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE), Key Middle-Skill Opportunities in Wisconsin provides a detailed look at projected job opportunities and wages in well-paying occupations that typically do not require a four-year college degree.

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  • Developed by COWS for Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE), Wisconsin RISE Target Population breaks down demographically those individuals who could use higher skills and better wages.

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  • Brown, M., D. Carey, A. Grodnik-Nagle, J. Irwin, and A. Nadav. Policies and Roles in Developing Energy Efficiency Finance Programs: Recommendations for RE-AMP. RE-AMP Energy Efficiency Finance Subgroup, 2011.

    Numerous barriers restrict the market for energy efficiency financing. The recommendations in this report suggest ways to reduce or eliminate these barriers in order to improve the function of the market.

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  • The State of Working Wisconsin – Update 2011 provides data on the unemployed and underemployed in the state.

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  • Grobe, T., K. O’Sullivan, S. T. Prouty, and S. White. A Green Career Pathways Framework: Postsecondary and Employment Success for Low-Income, Disconnected Youth. The Corps Network, 2011.

    This paper explores the extent to which this emerging green economy can offer a pathway out of poverty for low-income young people, many of whom have disengaged from school and are struggling to find a way into the economic mainstream. These disconnected youth — some six million strong — represent an untapped resource. Despite the fact that they have experienced difficulties in their personal lives or communities and may not have completed high school, many seek a second chance, returning to programs such as Service and Conservation Corps or other education and work initiatives in their local communities. The Corps Network and several partners — including COWS, Green For All, The Academy for Educational Development (AED), Workforce Strategy Center and Living Cities — guided the development of the paper with additional support from numerous stakeholders.

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  • This report summarizes some of the major changes included in the 2011-2013 Wisconsin budget affecting jobs, job quality, and economic development, along with a few other Governor Scott Walker initiatives.

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  • Co-published along with Demos, the report shows that Wisconsinites are facing a lack of good jobs, declining access to benefits, higher costs to raise children and decreasing access to post-secondary credentials, among other challenges. According to the briefing paper, these trends — combined with 2011-13 cuts to education, public worker pensions, and corporate taxes — are squeezing Wisconsin’s workers out of the middle class and moving economic opportunity and security further out of reach.

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  • Governor Scott Walker promised in his campaign to “create” 250,000 jobs during his first term, and his press office and the media regularly measure progress towards this goal. However, this report shows that Governor Scott Walker should not get credit (or blame) for overall jobs numbers in Wisconsin. These numbers are almost entirely driven by the national economy.

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  • COWS program and the work and research conducted.

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  • Smart Transportation is the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s (PennDOT) integrated response to the crisis of crumbling infrastructure and limited revenues to address it, and the need to better align transportation with community revitalization and sound land use policy. PennDOT was the first state program reviewed in detail by COWS’ State Smart Transportation Initiative (SSTI), and it remains one of our prime examples of a thoughtful DOT wrestling with the challenges of fiscal austerity, sustainability, and system preservation.

    The review was done at the request of PennDOT to assess the effectiveness of its Smart Transportation program in integrating land use and transportation in its decision-making and to identify areas of opportunity to advance the Smart Transportation agenda.

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  • The Wisconsin Values Budget is a balanced approach to our fiscal challenges that demonstrates Governor Scott Walker’s choices are not necessary choices. Through sacrifice that is fairly shared, and by building on Wisconsin’s history of progressive innovation, we can maintain and further improve public structures that work for everyone. The Wisconsin Values Budget, unlike the governor’s “cuts only” approach, begins again to truly share the burden of creating a dynamic and prosperous economy that promotes opportunity, security, and freedom for all Wisconsinites.

    Lead Sponsors: Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Citizen Action of Wisconsin, Institute for Wisconsin’s Future, COWS.

    Documents include long version (4 page) or short version (1 page) describing this alternative budget plan.

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  • COWS offers data on public-sector workers — their pay relative to the private-sector workforce, the size of Wisconsin’s public workforce over time, and analysis of what the wage reductions in the 2011-13 budget will cost different public workers — and data on the most most important cause of the state’s budget deficit: declining revenue due to the Great Recession.

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  • A look at why the Wisconsin Retirement System is one of the healthiest in the country.

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  • A research summary of findings by an EPI study comparing worker-compensation in the public-sector and the private-sector.

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  • Rogers, J., and S. Bernstein. “Infrastructure Investment”. Big Ideas for Job Creation: A Policy Briefing Highlighting Job Creating Initiatives , University of California Berkeley and Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2011, pp. 13-15.
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  • Rogers, J., S. Rhodes-Conway, and S. White. Retrofitting Institutions. University of California Berkeley and Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2011, pp. 18-19.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Foreward”. Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond , Wiley-Blackwell, 2011, p. xi-xii.
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  • Rogers, J., J. Cleveland, P. Plastrik, and C. Onyeagoro. Opportunities for Developing the Building Retrofit Industry and Market . COWS/Nupolis, 2011.
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  • Rogers, J., and L. Dresser. “ALEC Exposed: Business Domination Inc.”. The Nation, 2011, pp. 17-20.
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  • Bridges are innovative approaches to skill delivery that help adults in need of basic skills or English Language Learning succeed in post-secondary training. Leading to career-path employment or further learning in a specific industry or occupational sector, bridges at Wisconsin’s technical colleges typically link basic skills development with occupational skills training and accelerate the transition from pre-college to college level work.

    Wisconsin Bridges Case Studies profiles various bridge programs that are being piloted throughout the state. This case study discusses the CNC Skills Institute at Western Technical College.

    The case study was excerpted from full report. 

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  • Bridges are innovative approaches to skill delivery that help adults in need of basic skills or English Language Learning succeed in post-secondary training. Leading to career-path employment or further learning in a specific industry or occupational sector, bridges at Wisconsin’s technical colleges typically link basic skills development with occupational skills training and accelerate the transition from pre-college to college level work.

    Wisconsin Bridges Case Studies profiles various bridge programs that are being piloted throughout the state. This case study discusses the English Language Learning/Certified Nursing Assistant (ELL/CNA) Bridge at Northcentral Technical College.

    The case study was excerpted from full report. 

     

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  • Bridges are innovative approaches to skill delivery that help adults in need of basic skills or English Language Learning succeed in post-secondary training. Leading to career-path employment or further learning in a specific industry or occupational sector, bridges at Wisconsin’s technical colleges typically link basic skills development with occupational skills training and accelerate the transition from pre-college to college level work.

    Wisconsin Bridges Case Studies profiles various bridge programs that are being piloted throughout the state. This case study discusses the Artisan Baking/Culinary Bridge at Moraine Park Technical College.

    This case study was excerpted from the full report.

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  • Bridges are innovative approaches to skill delivery that help adults in need of basic skills or English Language Learning succeed in post-secondary training. Leading to career-path employment or further learning in a specific industry or occupational sector, bridges at Wisconsin’s technical colleges typically link basic skills development with occupational skills training and accelerate the transition from pre-college to college level work.

    Wisconsin Bridges Case Studies profiles various bridge programs that are being piloted throughout the state. This case study discusses the Production MIG Welding Bridge at Chippewa Valley Technical College.

    The case study was excerpted from full report. 

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  • Pagac, A. Better Jobs for In-Home Direct Care Workers. Direct Care Alliance, 2010.

    Direct care workers labor in the homes of the elderly, frail, and people with disabilities, to provide them with critical hands-on care and support to lead independed lives.

    This paper offers data on the in-home direct care workforce, wages and benefits in those jobs, and discusses issues related to working conditions and labor law. Information is provided on why low wages and benefits for in-home care workers are a social problem, not just a problem for individuals. Finally, key strategies to improve in-home direct care jobs are discussed.

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  • This report was released in conjunction with the Economic Policy Institute’s report documenting trends in employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) in the nation and states.

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  • Dresser, L., E. Navot, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2010. COWS, 2010.

    The State of Working Wisconsin is a biennial report, produced by COWS, that offers a comprehensive review of the status of jobs and workers in Wisconsin. On alternate years, we produce a short update report instead of the full report. The State of Working Wisconsin is filled with data and analysis on jobs, wages, poverty, and income, as well as an account of economic inequality in the state.

    The State of Working Wisconsin 2010 documents the impact of the Great Recession on Wisconsin workers.

    Documents include Full Report and Executive Summary

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  • This report presents recent data and analysis on the educational and workforce challenges facing Wisconsin, and provides an overview of statewide efforts to meet this challenge by moving more working adults through the educational pipeline and towards family-sustaining careers. It focuses specifically on various initiatives called “bridges” that are being pioneered at technical colleges across the state to help low-income adults access and succeed in postsecondary training.

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  • From COWS and the Wisconsin Women’s Council, this report shows that despite the growing importance of women’s contribution to the labor force and to household incomes, the gender wage gap stubbornly persists irrespective of age, race, or level of education. In 2009, Wisconsin women earned, on average, only 81 cents for every dollar earned by men. Moreover, women continue to be concentrated in occupations that are low-wage and low-quality.

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  • Two years of discussion and research since COWS and partners released Greener Pathways: Jobs and Workforce Development in the Clean Energy Economy, we’ve concluded that developing a comprehensive, comprehensible map of “green” credentials is virtually impossible. And that impossibility motivates our interest in moving toward a more coherent national system. Greener Skills, our follow up to Greener Pathways, outlines an American skills agenda and calls for a better, stronger, greener workforce system to support it.

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  • Mapping Green Career Pathways: Job Training Infrastructure and Opportunities in Wisconsin outlines key components of the state’s workforce development systems – including but not limited to apprenticeship and technical college pathways – that could be aligned and expanded to support an emerging clean energy sector.

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  • Bridges are innovative approaches to skill delivery that help adults in need of basic skills or English Language Learning succeed in post-secondary training. Leading to career-path employment or further learning in a specific industry or occupational sector, bridges at Wisconsin’s technical colleges typically link basic skills development with occupational skills training and accelerate the transition from pre-college to college level work.

    Wisconsin Bridges Case Studies profiles various bridge programs that are being piloted throughout the state. This case study discusses the Science/Math Developmental-Postsecondary Bridge at Madison Area Technical College.

    The case study was excerpted from the full report.

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  • , M. G. A. Platform for Creating and Retaining Midwestern Jobs in the New Energy Economy. The Council of State Governments, Midwestern Office, 2009.

    MGA (Midwestern Governors Association), report outlines strategies for job creation through state policy changes in the Midwest.

    COWS’ Sarah White served on the Advisory Board that developed and wrote the platform.

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  • Ho, S., and S. Rhodes-Conway. A Short Guide to Setting Up a City-Scale Retrofit Program. COWS, 2009.

    A Short Guide to Setting Up a City-Scale Retrofit Program, co-authored by Green For All and COWS, provides a model for designing and implementing weatherization and retrofitting programs on a citywide scale, with a goal of making these retrofits available to more households and providing good, entry-level jobs with career pathways.

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  • Greening Wisconsin’s Workforce: Training, Recovery, and the Clean Energy Economy tackles the question of how Wisconsin can best pursue the greener and more equitable promise of the clean energy economy. It looks at how the state can use Recovery Act dollars and a first-rate technical college system to ensure that the emerging green economy benefits Wisconsin’s working families.

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  • The Wisconsin Apollo Alliance is asking the Joint Finance Committee of the Wisconsin Legislature to take bold steps to move Wisconsin into the clean energy economy.  In a letter to the committee, it asks legislators to amend the Energy Independence Fund, so that at least a percentage of that fund must be used to build renewable energy supply chains in Wisconsin.

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  • This report, based on joint work by COWS (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and the Powell Center for Construction & Environment (University of Florida), suggests a way to get at least policy-level answers to the question of what kinds of jobs result from investment in building energy efficiency (EE). Program designers, armed with better knowledge of the building stock, energy costs, specific EE measures likely to be supported, and other local data, will be able to provide much more robust estimates as they move toward program implementation.

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  • Rhodes-Conway, S. Wisconsin Apollo State Policy Platform 2008-2009. COWS, 2009.

    The Wisconsin Apollo State Policy Platform for 2009 supports the promotion of clean energy manufacturing, to enact tougher appliance efficiency standards, to set higher goals for Wisconsin’s renewable portfolio standard, to make a major state effort in building efficiency, to cap, auction and invest, to create affordable, accessible, and comprehensive public transit systems, and to enact a low carbon fuel standard.

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  • Boardman, C., and E. Sundquist. “Toward Understanding Work Motivation: Worker Attitudes and the Perception of Effective Public Service”. The American Review of Public Administration, Vol. 39, no. 5, SAGE Publications, 2009, pp. 519-35.

    Government reformers in the United States have recently focused on running public agencies more like private firms by emphasizing economic rewards, such as merit pay. Meanwhile, a body of literature has grown that indicates that public servants respond to factors that financially based reward initiatives tend to ignore.

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  • Held October 29, 2009, in Madison, Wisconsin, this publication provides a brief summary of the discussion and findings of the Women, Jobs and Wisconsin’s Green Economy Public Policy Roundtable. COWS was a key participant and the Proceedings document many of our views on the Green Economy.

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  • In what will play a major role in Wisconsin’s economic recovery, more than 426,000 “middle-skill” job openings — those that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a four-year degree — are projected for the state by 2016, concludes this study by The Workforce Alliance (TWA) and the Skills2Compete-Wisconsin campaign, of which of COWS is a lead partner.

    The report, which tracks Wisconsin’s jobs at the middle-skill level, notes that funds from federal economic recovery legislation, especially the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, are expected to create more than one million new jobs across the country and that Wisconsin has a number of exemplary middle-skill education and training opportunities. These opportunities must continue to keep up with the anticipated demand for middle-skill workers.

    Skills2Compete-Wisconsin believes every Wisconsinite should have access to education or training past high school — leading to a technical college degree or diploma, occupational credential, industry certification, or one’s first two years of college — to be pursued at whatever point and pace makes sense for individual workers and industries.

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  • Developed by COWS for Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE), Key Middle-Skill Opportunities in Wisconsinprovides a detailed look at projected job opportunities and wages in well-paying occupations that typically do not require a four-year college degree.

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  • Developed by COWS for Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE), this report breaks down demographically those individuals who could use higher skills and better wages.

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  • The State of Working Wisconsin – Update 2009 gives a snapshot of the effects of the recession on Wisconsin workers and their families, and reports on other key trends.

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  • Bernhardt (Editor), A., H. Boushey (Editor), L. Dresser (Editor), C. Tilly (Editor), and S. Martelle. Confronting the Gloves-Off Economy: America’s Broken Labor Standards and How to Fix Them. 2009.

    Across the United States, growing numbers of employers are breaking, bending, or evading long-established laws and standards designed to protect workers, from the minimum wage to job safety rules to the right to organize. This “gloves-off economy,” no longer confined to a marginal set of sweatshops and fly-by-night small businesses, is sending shock waves into every corner of the low-wage — and sometimes not so low-wage — labor market. What can be done to reverse this dangerous trend?

    This report, based on the book The Gloves-Off Economy: Labor Standards at the Bottom of America’s Labor Market (a Labor and Employment Relations Association volume published by Cornell University Press), provides a comprehensive yet compact summary of gloves-off practices, the workers who are affected by them, and strategies for enforcing workplace standards. The editors, four prominent labor scholars including COWS’ Associate Director Laura Dresser, have brought together economists, sociologists, labor attorneys, union strategists, and other experts to offer varying perspectives on both the problem and the creative, practical solutions currently being developed in a wide range of communities and industries. Bernhardt, Boushey, Dresser, and Tilly and the volume’s 18 other authors combine rigorous analysis with a stirring call to renew worker protections.

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  • This report evaluates Madison Area Technical College‘s (MATC’s) Science/Math Bridge, a pilot initiative to increase opportunities for lower-skill individuals to access – and succeed in – the college’s science-based postsecondary programs.

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  • This report makes the case for a higher minimum wage in Wisconsin. Though the July 23, 2009, increase of the federal and state minimum wage to $7.25 will put money in the pockets of 196,000 Wisconsin working adults. A proposal by state leaders to increase the state minimum to $7.60 and index it annually to inflation would bring higher wages to some 316,000 workers and put $108 million dollars into the economy.

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  • Vidal, M. “Reconstructing the Local Labor Market: The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership and BIG STEP”. International Labor Brief, Vol. 7, no. 6, KLS Korean Labor Institute, 2009, pp. 29-39.

    This article, published in the International Labor Brief of the Korea Labor Institute, discusses the formation of the Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership/BIG STEP, its maturation as a key labor market intermediary in the Milwaukee regional economy, and how it is faring in the current economic crisis.

    Documents include original and English Translation.

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  • Rogers, J., and K. vanden Heuvel. Metropolis Now. New Statesman, 2009.
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  • Rogers, J. “Seizing the Opportunity (for Climate, Jobs, and Equity) in Building Energy Efficiency”. Innovation and Equity Transform America, Community Innovators Lab, MIT, 2008, pp. 91-107.
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  • Rogers, J., and J. Cohen. “”. The Good Society, Vol. 17, no. 1, 2008, pp. 13-19.
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  • Francis, G., K. Gordon, K. Hanniman, and S. Rhodes-Conway. IGCC With Carbon Capture and Storage: Opportunities and Challenges for Labor. COWS, 2008.

    This report asserts that this new generation of coal plants would comply more easily with current and projected environmental regulations and provide more stable employment for utility workers than traditional coal plants.  Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, with their potential for carbon capture and storage (CCS), may be an important piece of this energy future, especially as carbon regulation comes into effect.

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  • Hudson, G., J. Rogers, and P. Thompson. Eyes on the Prize: Program Architecture of Emerald Cities. COWS, 2008.

    This memo offers suggestions on program architecture for a national effort to build “emerald” cities, shorthand for high-road cities committed to greening their economies in equitable and democratically accountable ways.

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  • Walsh, J., D. Baker, B. Goldstein, B. Hendricks, J. Rogers, and L. Shepherd. Clean Energy Corps: Jobs, Service and Equal Opportunity in America’s Clean Energy Economy. COWS, 2008.

    The Clean Energy Corp will be a combined service, training, and job creation effort to combat global warming, grow local and regional economies and demonstrate the equity and employment promise of the clean energy economy. Documents include Full Report and Executive Summary.

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  • Education and skills will be the cornerstone of competitiveness for Wisconsin.  Leaders throughout the state and its southeastern region, known as the Milwaukee 7 (M7),  are working in new ways to build the skills of the workforce and to ensure that regional employers have the employee and skill base they need.  Research laid out in this report, conducted over the summer of 2008, is intended to help strengthen these efforts by providing more information on a key population in need of skills—adult basic education (ABE) students—and offering some insights on student perceptions of their own skills, the labor market, and the training they need to move ahead.  Further, the report provides more detailed information on the broader population of low-wage working adults in the M7 region. The conclusion offers some policy suggestions that would help enhance the advancement prospects of regional ABE students.

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  • This report provides a detailed picture of the region’s health care workforce, offering for the first time representative information from hospitals throughout the South Central/Southwest region.

    Documents include Full Report and Response (Janice K. Bultema, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics).

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. State of Working Wisconsin 2008. COWS, 2008.

    The State of Working Wisconsin 2008, a biennial report on how the state and its workers are faring. Documents include Full Report and Summary.

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  • Co-released by the COWS and the Wisconsin Women’s Council, finds that Wisconsin women of all ages and education experience a substantial and persistent gender wage gap – earning only about 78 cents on the dollar compared with men. A COWS Spotlight Report.

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  • Two interconnected challenges are colliding in Wisconsin with potentially dire consequences for families and businesses. Demographic and workforce shifts are resulting in shortages of skilled workers for many industries, while at the same time many Wisconsinites aren’t receiving the education and training necessary to land a decent job with family-sustaining wages. COWS report, Skilled Workers, Quality Jobs: Meeting the Needs of Wisconsin’s Workers and Businesses, addresses these two interrelated challenges and makes a series of policy recommendations to address them.

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  • Developed by COWS for Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE) Partnership, Key Middle-Skill Opportunities in Wisconsin provides a detailed look at projected job opportunities and wages in well-paying occupations that typically do not require a 4-year college degree.

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  • Produced by the Apollo Alliance and Green For All, in partnership with COWS and Center for American Progress, Green Collar Jobs in America’s Cities makes a strong case that pursuing a four-step strategy—essentially a metropolitan green business and jobs development plan—provides a wealth of environmental, economic, and social benefits, including what it calls “a pathway out of poverty” for thousands of unemployed, under-employed, and hard to employ people in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

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  • Greener Pathways details current economic and workforce development opportunities in three leading industries: energy efficiency, wind, and biofuels. The report also examines federal resources that can support state green jobs initiatives, and concludes by outlining a plan of action for state policymakers. Documents include Full Report and Summary.

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  • Mitnik, P., J. Halpern-Finnerty, and M. Vidal. Cities and Immigration: Local Policies for Immigrant-Friendly Cities. COWS, 2008.

    This report aims at helping elected officials, policy-makers, activists, community-based organizations and city residents advocate for, design and implement progressive city policies toward immigrants. These goals have become particularly important given the recent failures of comprehensive immigration reform initiatives at the federal level. Building on policy experiments and experiences from all around the country, the report offers a menu of local policies aimed at creating immigrant-friendly cities.

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  • Building retrofits, with their associated cost-savings for the working class and poor and “green collar” job opportunities, are a natural way to meet both demands. This opportunity is especially evident in cities, with their density of inefficient buildings, poor people, generally progressive politics, and leadership on climate.

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  • Provides a thorough review of jobs, wages, poverty, income, and job quality in the state on a bi-annual basis.

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  • Madison, Wisconsin, July 3, 2007 – A new report from the Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS), Corporate Tax and Subsidy Disclosure: Policy Options for Wisconsin, highlights policy weaknesses and proposes a new tax and subsidy disclosure policy that would affect all publicly-traded corporations (“C” corporations) and their subsidiaries doing business in the state.

    After reviewing other states’ current and proposed tax disclosure plans, the new COWS report recommends that Wisconsin adopt a policy requiring these companies to disclose, at a minimum, how much they pay in taxes to the state, how much business they do in the state, and how much financial help they get from the state. This information would then be made available to the public in a searchable database.

    “This level of transparency is key for policymakers and the public to better evaluate the tax system and see if it is truly working in the economic interests of the state,” said Kate Gordon, lead author of the report and senior associate at COWS.

    The report points to Illinois as an important example. Illinois has enacted one of the nation’s most comprehensive corporate subsidy disclosure laws. The 2003 Illinois Corporate Accountability Act requires companies receiving any number of state economic development dollars to report on their progress in achieving job creation, retention and wage promises made in subsidy deals.

    “Illinois has developed a database that allows the policymakers and public to understand what investments the state is making,” Gordon said. “Something like this is feasible and realistic for Wisconsin as well.”

    Additional transparency would benefit Wisconsin’s businesses as well, because it could lead to a fairer tax system. The fairer tax system would allow companies that shoulder their full tax burden under existing laws to be more competitive with those companies taking advantage of unfair tax loopholes and unchecked subsidies.

    As the report points out, exposing the current tax and subsidy system to public scrutiny may well lead to fewer tax loopholes, and in turn to increased corporate tax revenues. The end result is more money flowing to state programs such as workforce training, education, infrastructure and other public resources that are highly valued by firms – more highly valued, by most accounts, than low taxes.

    Corporate Tax and Subsidy Disclosure: Policy Options for Wisconsin, can be found online at: www.cows.org/pdf/rp-corp-tax.pdf.

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  • What can cities do to improve the quality of jobs? How can cities boost the access of the disadvantaged to the good jobs available in their jurisdictions? Building from policy innovations and experiences from all around the country, this report offers a menu of city policies aimed at improving job quality and redistributing job opportunities in favor of the disadvantaged.

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  • Gordon , K., and K. Hanniman. Corporate Tax and Subsidy Disclosure: Policy Options for Wisconsin. COWS, 2007.

    COWS report highlights policy weaknesses and proposes a new tax and subsidy disclosure policy that would affect all publicly-traded corporations (“C” corporations) and their subsidiaries doing business in the state.

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  • A Robert Lynch study released today shows that the benefits of investing in high quality early education in Wisconsin would be more than 9 times the cost of the program in 2050. Total benefits -budgetary, earning, and crime prevention – would exceed $13 billion, more than nine times the cost to the state for universal 3 and 4 year-old programs.

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  • A collaborative effort with the Apollo Alliance and Urban Habitat, this report is a reflection of their shared belief in the potential of the “green economy” to generate quality jobs in our nation’s low-income communities and communities of color.

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  • COWS offers concrete policy ideas that will help build a stronger Wisconsin.

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  • Wisconsin is ripe for a far-reaching, comprehensive energy strategy that will move the state toward energy efficiency and independence.  The state depends heavily on three energy and fuel sources that are produced entirely out of state: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.  Importing all this energy comes at a high cost to the state—each year, Wisconsinites spend over nine billion dollars on energy imports, more than half of which goes toward petroleum products including heating oil, unleaded fuel, and diesel fuels.  These costs are likely to go up as a result of worldwide fuel shortages, natural disasters, and political instability in oil-producing regions. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • , C. Technical Colleges and Adult Learners. COWS, 2007, p. 3.

    Improving access to training for working adults, building stronger linkages to the local economy and increasing adult basic education funding will help Wisconsin’s technical college system add even more value to the economy. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • , C. Early Childhood Education. COWS, 2007, p. 3.

    Strengthening the state’s childcare subsidy program, improving compensation for childcare workers and further investment in 4-year old kindergarten will help protect and nurture our children. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • Raising the minimum wage, indexing it to inflation, and ensuring that resources support and enforce the standard can help make the low-wage labor market stronger in the state. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • Policy makers could use better information on which corporations are not paying income tax, where the loopholes are to reform and improve tax policy in the state. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • Investments in economic development should only be made if policy makers and state residents can really count on them paying off. A COWS Fast Facts report.

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  • A look at the economic challenges that women still face in the Wisconsin Economy. A COWS Spotlight Issue.

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  • Stronger Ladders, Stronger Floors: The Need for Both Supply and Demand Strategies to Improve Workers’ Opportunities by Laura Dresser uses data from Mitnik and Zeidenberg’s paper to explore issues about building career ladders. The paper provides some data to help direct and focus career ladder development, and includes discussion of the need for both supply and demand side strategies when improving jobs.

    From Bad to Good Jobs? An Analysis of the Prospects for Career Ladders in the Service Industries by Pablo Mitnik and Matt Zeidenberg discusses the various assumptions that are embedded in career ladder strategies, and investigates the extent to which the very structure of specific service industries may stand in the way of building advancement. The paper provides careful analysis of upward and downward mobility within specific industries, and considers the systematic prospects of career ladder strategies.

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  • Pablo Mitnik and Matt Zeidenberg discuss the various assumptions that are embedded in career ladder strategies, and investigates the extent to which the very structure of specific service industries may stand in the way of building advancement. The report provides careful analysis of upward and downward mobility within specific industries, and considers the systematic prospects of career ladder strategies.

    Stronger Ladders, Stonger Floors: The Need for Both Supply and Demand Strategies to Improve Workers’ Opportunities by Laura Dresser uses data from Mitnik and Zeidenberg to explore issues about building career ladders. The report provides some data to help direct and focus career ladder development, and includes discussion of the need for both supply and demand side strategies when improving jobs.
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  • Freeman, R. B., and J. Rogers. “The Promise of Progressive Federalism”. Remaking America: Democracy and Public Policy in an Age of Inequality, Russell Sage Foundation, 2007, pp. 205-27.

    There is much in federalism that should excite anyone seeking the variety, experimentation, and learning that states can bring to finding solutions to national problems. Progressive federalism seeks to harness this potential state contribution to our national democracy without retreating from civil rights and a national affirmative state.

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  • Many economic indicators—from poverty to incarceration—show dismal outcomes for Wisconsin’s African Americans.  The vitality of our economy, the prosperity of our state, and the health and well-being of all our communities are seriously threatened by the racial disparity that plagues Wisconsin.

    This COWS Spotlight Issue provides background data and indicators showing pervasive black/white inequality in the state.

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  • Laura Dresser uses data (From Bad to Good Jobs? An Analysis of the Prospects for Career Ladders in the Service Industries) to explore issues about building career ladders. The paper provides some data to help direct and focus career ladder development, and includes discussion of the need for both supply and demand side strategies when improving jobs.

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  • Rogers, J., L. Dresser, M. Vidal, and H. Wial. “”. Number WP-2006-03, Sloan Industry Studies Working Papers, 2006.
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  • Rogers, J. “”. Labor History, Vol. 4, Champaign/Urbana, IL: Illinois University Press, 2006, pp. 559-66.
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  • COWS highlights the importance of workers’ basic skills to Wisconsin’s economic health, and suggests ways for improving basic skills education in the state.

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  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2006. COWS, 2006.

    COWS releases The State of Working Wisconsin every two years, in conjunction with the release of The State of Working America by the Economic Policy Institute.

    2006 marks the 10th year of the publication and the expansion of the report to include ‘COWS Issue Spotlights’ highlighting key Wisconsin topics such as health care and pension benefits, the trap of low wage jobs, and Wisconsin’s energy use. In addition, the report features ‘Fast Facts,’ making it easier for readers to quickly access key state statistics.

    Documents include both Full Report and Executive Summary.

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  • COWS’ report profiles key economic and demographic trends in the vital SWSC (Southwest & South Central) corner of Wisconsin. It provides the background data needed to better understand the dynamics of the region, and suggests some important ways, given these data, to improve worker skills, firm productivity, economic development, and long-term planning in SWSC.

    Seeds of Workforce Change represents a collaborative effort to align and strengthen economic and workforce development systems in the region. The report was produced by COWS, with the input of many key stakeholders in the region, for the Workforce Development Boards of South Central and Southwest Wisconsin. It was made possible by a grant from Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development as part of Governor Jim Doyle’s “Growing Regional Opportunities in Wisconsin” (GROW) initiative.

    Documents provided include Full Report and Executive Summary.

     

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  • Gordon, K., M. Mayrl, S. Rhodes-Conway, and B. Siu. New Energy for Cities: Energy-Saving & Job Creation Policies for Local Governments. COWS, 2006.
    Written for the Apollo Alliance, COWS offers dozens of proven policies and practices for city officials in this report.
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  • On June 1, 2006, Wisconsin’s minimum wage rose to $6.50 an hour. This was the second of a two-step increase that began on June 1, 2005, when the state minimum wage was increased from the federal minimum of $5.15 an hour to $5.70 an hour.

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  • Prepared by COWS for the Energy Center of Wisconsin (now Seventhwave) on behalf of Wisconsin Governor Jim Doyle’s Consortium on Biobased Industry.

    This study (in three volumes) is intended to paint, in broad strokes, the background for the Wisconsin bioeconomy picture. To fill in some of the details, we provide a companion Technical Study dedicated to exploring the specific feedstocks currently grown in Wisconsin, and their potential to anchor various bioindustry processes. Taken together, the Briefing Paper and the Technical Study point toward a key conclusion: in order to create a successful bioeconomy, Wisconsin must not only build on its existing resources and infrastructure, but must also pursue specific policies targeted toward creating an economy that includes a range of rural and urban jobs, entrepreneurship opportunities, ownership opportunities for rural landowners, and economic incentives balanced with environmental protections.

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  • Rogers, J. Build the High Road Here. Vol. 282, The Nation, 2006, pp. 25-26.

    In The Nation, April 17, 2006, Build the High Road Here asserts that the “high road”- a road of increased productivity, improved government efficiency, higher citizen engagement, implemented environmental standards, and smart growth policies that reduce commuting times and lower real housing costs- should all serve as an internationals strategy to balance capital markets and strengthen democracy.

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  • Godon, K., M. Mayrl, S. Rhodes-Conway, and B. Siu. New Energy for States: Energy-Saving Policies for Governors and Legislators. COWS, 2006.

    Written for the Apollo Alliance, COWS lays out various methods that states can implement in order to reduce energy use, achieve energy savings, and move towards reliance on renewable energy and fuel technologies. Legislation should set standards for construction of green buildings and in the sun, wind, and bio-based industries, should offer incentives for efficient car use and transit development, and should encourage investments to improve job quality.

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  • Research has suggested that certain manufacturing sectors should be “saved” over other sectors with respect to changes within international competitive markets. The authors report on Sustained Advanced Manufacturing.

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  • While Wisconsin has a history of a relatively high level of equality, the past two decades have continuously resulted in greater wealth disparities. Wisconsin legislators need to focus on maintaining the high level of economic equality seen in previous decades by building the skills and education of Wisconsin’s workforce.

    COWS and Wisconsin Council on Children & Families report Pulling Apart: Wisconsin’s Growing Income Inequality is based on Pulling Apart, a State-by-State Analysis of Income Trends published by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute.

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  • Sterzinger, G., J. Stevens, and M. Svrcek. Component Manufacturing: Wisconsin’s Future in the Renewable Energy Industry. Renewable Energy Policy Project (REPP), 2006.

    It is the intent of this report to outline the potential for Wisconsin from a national commitment to accelerate renewable energy development

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  • The Apollo Alliance and the Campus Climate Challenge recommend that all campuses institute six basic reforms, the details of which are outlined in this report.

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  • COWS takes a close look at the “hidden public costs” of low wage jobs and reveals that many working families do not earn sufficient wages and benefits to care for their families.

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  • COWS report offers strategies for Wisconsin’s cities and villages to use their TIF (tax incremental financing) funds to expand local economies and leverage for high-quality, sustainable development.

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  • Created in 1996, Jobs With a Future (JWF) brings together leading stakeholders in South Central Wisconsin — including the City of Madison, Dane County, Madison Area Technical College (MATC), the Workforce Development Board of South Central Wisconsin (WDBSCW), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison — to build and pursue a strategic vision for workforce development in the region.

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  • The Industry Partnerships Project, a project funded by a $1.14 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to the Workforce Development Board of South Central Wisconsin, is examined in this article by COWS.

    The Industry Partnerships Project has three main goals:

    1- To provide training to incumbent workers that would enable them to take on new responsibilities and/or advance beyond entry-level positions in health care and manufacturing,

    2- To improve employment opportunities for the growing number of dislocated workers in the region,

    3- To build and strengthen relationships between employers and institutional partners.

     

    COWS has five observations regarding the Industry Partnerships Projects with respect to the Wisconsin economy:

    1- With the right infrastructure and relationships in place, a large and timely public investment in training can pay off in significant and lasting ways for workers, employers, and the public sector,

    2- When an industry experiences a labor or skills shortage, as health care did during the course of this project, employers will actively participate in workforce training, especially training that involves intensive and technical skills. (However, the cost of technical training may be prohibitive for some firms, once public funding disappears),

    3- Even when an industry is suffering substantial setbacks, as manufacturing was during the period of this project, employers will participate actively, especially in training that is geared toward leadership and communication skills development,

    4- Dislocated workers benefit from training programs designed for incumbent workers by developing the skills local employers need. To better serve dislocated workers, however, training must be delivered differently than it is to those with jobs,

    5- A limited-term, publicly funded investment in worker training can help build long-term relationships between employers and public partners.

  • Released September 11, 2005, Joel Rogers offers his insight on Hurricane Katrina proposing that the disaster following the storm is a result of a region made vulnerable to the effects of a hurricane because of low-road development, such as unregulated construction and other development, low wages and concentrated poverty, disrespect for nature, starved and unaccountable government agencies without much serious interest in or capacity for planning.

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  • COWS’ State of Working Wisconsin Update, is a bi-annual report providing a thorough review of jobs, wages, poverty, income, and job quality in the state.

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  • Helper, S., G. Herrigel, D. Luria, J. Rogers, M. Vidal, J. Whitford, H. Wial, and E. Wiarda. Full-Utilization Learning Lean in Component Manufacturing: A New Industrial Model for Mature Regions, & Labor’s Stake in Its Success. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industry Studies, 2005.

    A Working Paper and project, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industry Studies.
    The Industry Studies program, launched in 1990 and completed in 2010, aimed to promote high quality scholarship about particular industries through encouraging close interaction between academics and industry practitioners.

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  • This report brings together a number of different strategies that can be used individually or in concert to reduce energy use and achieve real energy savings. These strategies are focused on building operations, renewable energy development, transportation, and financing.

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  • Borosage, R., and J. Rogers. Both An Imperative and An Opportunity. South Florida Sun-Sentinel, 2005, p. 23A.

    The Energy Bill from the George W. Bush era caters to the special interests of oil companies and does not reduce dependence on foreign oil. New energy for America requires investments in renewable energies and job openings in renewable energy sector as well as incentives for states and municipalities who are already taking action on environmental sustainability.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Cities: The Vital Core. Vol. 280, The Nation, 2005, pp. 20-22.
    From The Nation, June 20, 2005.
    Cities are the most productive and most sustainable centers of the US economy, the most vital and generous centers of our culture and, potentially, the most democratic and forward-looking of our many units of government. They have been neglected in terms of their impact on the economy (the metropolitan area constitutes about 80% of the US population), in their power to pioneer equality (the metro core is where different races coincide, where upper and middle classes live, where most research and education institution are located, where new commerce and innovation begins), in that their sheer size and weight make metro regions a point of leverage in the national economy (here begins “high road” policies).
    Document
  • Wisconsin’s tax incremental financing (TIF) was originally intended to provide crucial assistance for urban redevelopment projects. Today however, it has grown into a program with responsibility for promoting all kinds of economic development across the state. This unchecked growth is not without side effects, as the current program may actually discourage urban redevelopment and increase the opportunities for misuse of the program. This report proposes a solution to these problems through three reforms that create a stronger tax incremental district (TID) classification system, remove TIF-based incentives for developing open land, and add incentives for stricter joint review board examination of TIF project plans.

    Documents include both Full Report and Executive Summary.

    Document Document
  • Rogers, J. “An Industrial Policy That Works”. Challenge: The Magazine of Economic Affairs, Vol. 48, no. 6, 2005, pp. 6-16.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “The Delphi Oracle”. The Nation, Vol. 281, 2005, pp. 25-26.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Step for Voting Reform. no. 280, The Nation, 2005, pp. 4-5.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. Devolve This!. Vol. 279, The Nation, 2004, pp. 20-28.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., Institute for America’s Future, and Perryman Group. New Energy for America: The Apollo Jobs Report. Apollo Alliance, 2004.
    Document
  • Bernhardt, A., and J. Rogers. “Taking the High Road in Milwaukee: The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership”. Partnering for Change: How Unions and Community Groups Build Coalitions for Economic Justice , M.E. Sharpe, 2004, pp. 231-48.

    Wisconsin has been home to a series of interrelated partnerships between labor and employers that have built institutions to support high-road business practice around quality, worker training, innovation, and cooperation. COWS has been pivotal in these experiments.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Devolve This! Toward a Progressive Strategy in the States”. Taking Back America: And Taking Down the Radical Right, Avalon/Nation Books, 2004, pp. 173-89.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. Progressives Should Vote Edwards. The Nation, 2004.

    Reprinted in The Capital Times as “ Joel Rogers: Progressives should vote for Edwards as best on issues,” February 12, 2004.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Unfulfilled Promise”. The Nation, Boulder CO: Westview Press, 2004.
    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. State of Working Wisconsin 2004. COWS, 2004.

    The State of Working Wisconsin offers an analysis of unemployment and underemployment in the state.
    Documents below offer Full Report and Executive Summary.

    Document Document
  • Wisconsin’s Job Centers were created in the 1980’s to serve as facilities where job seekers and employers can “one-stop shop” for a range of employment-related services. Budget cuts have strained these facilities’ abilities to provide resources to the workers and employers of the state. This report looks at the impact shrinking budgets have on the job centers and consequently on Wisconsin’s workforce development.

    Document
  • Bernhardt, A., and J. Rogers. Taking the High Road in Milwaukee: The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership. Vol. 5, no. 3, Working USA, 2004, pp. 109-30.

    Wisconsin has been home to a series of interrelated partnerships between labor and employers that have built institutions to support high-road business practice around quality, worker training, innovation, and cooperation. COWS has been pivotal in these experiments.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Labor Politics in an Age of Fear”. The Future of Labor Unions: Organized Labor in the 21st Century, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, 2004, pp. 187-98.

    Chapter 8 in editors Julius G. Getman and Ray Marshall’s The Future of Labor Unions: Organized Labor in the 21st Century.
    Why progressives in America, especially included in the labor force, are politically week during the George W. Bush. era. The US labor force carries much weight and can inevitably propel the move from the “low road” to the “high road” of economic prosperity.

    Document
  • Bernhardt, A., L. Dresser, and E. Hatton. Moving Hotels to the High Road: Strategies That Help Workers and Firms Succeed. COWS, 2003.

    This report is about model solutions for the hospitality industry, and how they can be built. Based on detailed background research, hundreds of hours of interviews, discussions, and site visits at eight hotels in four different cities,  a comprehensive picture of this critical industry — not only how it looks right now, but also its potential to be an even stronger sector that offers better career opportunities — is shown.

    This project was supported by the Rockefeller and Russell Sage Foundations.

    Document
  • Model Work Standards are intended as a quality assessment tool to be used alongside the other previously established measures to ensure that both children and adults involved in child care enjoy quality experiences. The central goal of the Model Work Standards is to achieve improvements in job quality by creating a supportive work environment, increasing shared decision making and communication, fostering teamwork and cooperation, and encouraging empowerment among child care workers.

    In this report, cases are used to show how the Model Work Standards provide positive effects across the board for centers and family providers.

    Document
  • Focusing on frontline caregivers in nursing homes in the South Central Wisconsin region, this report is a follow-up to the 1999 report, extending the earlier investigation to a six-county area that includes Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Jefferson, Marquette, and Sauk Counties.

    South Central Wisconsin is home to more than 10,000 frontline caregivers in nursing homes, home health agencies, and other sectors of the region’s diverse and dynamic health care industry. In this report, we rely on data for the region’s nursing homes to investigate the challenges and correlates of turnover among frontline caregivers.

    Documents include the Full Report and Summary.

    Document Document
  • COWS investigates the effects of raising the minimum wage in Wisconsin. Since the most recent state legislative proposal would have raised Wisconsin’s wage floor to $6.80 per hour, we use that as the benchmark in our report. This report relies on data and analyses provided by the Economic Policy Institute.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin: Update 2003. COWS, 2003.

    Every two years, COWS produces The State of Working Wisconsin.

    Relying on data provided by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI), COWS offers “The State of Working Wisconsin: Update 2003” as a brief investigation of the effects of the continuing economic slowdown on workers in the state.

    Document
  • COWS and Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy report on a national report explaining exactly “who pays” taxes in Wisconsin.

    Document
  • This report summarizes research on Wisconsin component manufacturing undertaken during the recent period (June 2003). The component manufacturing industry group, heavily concentrated in the Upper Midwest, supplies parts and subsystems to the leading national end-user manufacturing industries, including autos; farm, mining, and construction equipment; and electrical appliances. As a sub-sector of manufacturing, it stands in the value chain between machine tools and the large end-user industries it feeds and provides a base. Its critical location makes it an exemplary nexus of more general pressures on U.S. manufacturing, and of great strategic importance in their resolution. Our research has examined those pressures and firm strategy of response in three areas: the relation of supplier firms and their customer OEMs (original equipment manufacturers); intermediary institutions within industry; and public policy.

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  • This report is a direct look at the problems that confront Wisconsin’s working poor families, and good information about how some of those problems can be solved.

    The Annie E. Casey Foundation used the release of five state-level reports to bring working poor families into the spotlight of state and national policy.

    Document
  • “Hotel Workers and Industry Change” is a research project of COWS. Its goal is to understand how industry restructuring has affected hotel workers — and how hotels can stay competitive while providing secure, family-supporting jobs. COWS researchers are assessing the impact of this restructuring on workers, and investigating how to mitigate its negative effects.

    Document
  • This COWS and WISPIRG report looks at programs in Wisconsin that are wasting money and harming the environment.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. “Part of the Solution: Emerging Workforce Intermediaries In the United States”. Governing Work and Welfare in a New Economy: European and American Experiments, Oxford University Press, 2003, pp. 266-91.

    Chapter 10, in editors Jonathan Zeitlin and David Trubek’s Governing Work and Welfare in a New Economy: European and American Experiments.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Little to Celebrate on Labor Day. Wisconsin State Journal, 2003, p. A10.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “This Call May Be Recorded”. The New Leader, Vol. 38, New York: Oxford University Press, 2003, pp. 28-9.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Taxes Bad Mantra Is Wrong”. The Capital Times, Madison Newspapers, Inc., 2002, p. 7A.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Editorial
    March 11, 2002

    Document
  • COWS evaluation of the development of the Local Child Care Wage Initiative.

    Document
  • One report of the Regional Briefing Paper Series, a grassroots public education campaign that follows the “Sustaining Wisconsin” model.
    Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Green, Jefferson, Rock, and Sauk Counties: An Economic, Social, Environmental and Political Snapshot

    Document
  • Rogers, J., and J. Keckhaver. Tax Burden Analysis Sorely needed. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2002.

    Reprinted as “Study Sought: Who Pays State Taxes?,” Wisconsin Alliance of Cities E-Newsletter, December 30, 2002.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. ‘Privatize’ Equals ‘Redistribute’. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Social Security Scare Is Big Lie. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Keep the Government, Dissolve the People!. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Wow! Greed Really Isn’t Enough!. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. An Economic Plan – Not. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Scams for Rich Spotlight Greed. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Base Opinion Of Power: The Future On All The Facts. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Has U.S. Forgotten Its Ideals?. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. No End in Sight to State Deficits. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Power Plan Would Take U.S. For Fools. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Just Who’s ’Taking’ What?. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Steps to Regain State Democracy. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Let’s Clean Up Elections First. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Can State Return to Greatness?. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. No Fun In Dysfunctional Government. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Anti-Tax Slogans Just Don’t Fit. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Assembly Budget Truly Sad. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Budget Fix Demands ‘T’ Word. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. ‘Taxes Bad’ Mantra Is Wrong. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. The Governor and the L Word. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. How Taxes Used Is What Counts. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Deficit Blues II: The Myths. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Deficit Blues Settle Over State. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Mini-Enron Gives Us a Chance. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. SOS! Milwaukee Needs Help. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Potential High for Inner Cities. The Capital Times, 2002.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • COWS 2-page report on the overview of the Milwaukee Jobs Initiative (MJI) and the importance of corresponding partnerships.

    Document
  • An overview of “Sustaining Wisconsin”, a COWS outreach program designed to bring Wisconsin residents the “real story” about important public-policy issues that affect their lives.

    Document
  • COWS overview of the Local Child Care Wage Initiative, a two-year pilot program, inaugurated by the City of Madison and Dane County in 2000. This is the fourth report.

    Document
  • COWS report of the Local Child Care Wage Initiative. COWS assumes that improving the income of caregivers will help keep dedicated workers in the field and reduce turnover of the workforce. This third report discusses turnover, why turnover is a special problem in the child care field, and reasons that turnover rates in full-day group child care centers are so high. This report also examines empirical evidence of the relationship between turnover, child care quality, and care workers’ wages in Dane County.

    Document
  • Boyne, S., and J. Rogers. A Snapshot of Federal Funding to Wisconsin. COWS, 2002.

    Prepared for
    October 14-16, 2002
    Wisconsin Economic Summit 3
    Milwaukee, WI

    Wisconsin’s fiscal crisis has sparked a fierce debate about state tax and spending levels as well as the state’s lack of a comprehensive economic development strategy. Unfortunately most state policymakers have ignored the fact that, in addition to the imbalance that exists within the state between revenues and spending, there is a wide disparity in the financial flows between Wisconsin and the federal government. The sum of federal tax payments that Wisconsinites send to the nation’s capital outpaces federal domestic spending within the state by a wide margin.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2002. COWS, 2002.

    The State of Working Wisconsin, 2002 is our attempt to answer questions regarding the recent recession and unemployment with the best and most recent data available. Drawing on a wide variety of information on family incomes, taxes, wages, unemployment, and poverty, it examines the impact of today’s economy on Wisconsin workers and families.

    Documents include both Full Report and Summary.

    Document Document
  • Keckhaver, J. Wisconsin Tax Fact Sheets. COWS, 2002.

    A collection of tax facts on various budget and tax issues in Wisconsin.

    Document
  • A report about the structure and persistence of low-wage jobs in Wisconsin (August 2002).

    Document
  • ,. “Wisconsin Manufacturers Development Consortium Cluster Development Policy in Action”. The Advanced Manufacturing Project, COWS, 2002.

    The Wisconsin Manufacturers Development Consortium (WMDC), in conjunction with the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership, was formed in 1998 to improve supplier performance and to promote progressive supply management practices in the state of Wisconsin. This is considered an Interim Report.

    Document
  • Freeman, R. B., and J. Rogers. A Proposal to American Labor. no. 274, The Nation, 2002, pp. 18-24.

    This June 24, 2002 article discusses the changing dynamic within labor unions-present labor organizing is not keeping pace with economic changes and a nearly lethal employer and policy environment. The authors propose the idea of “open-source unionism,” a type of unionism in which membership is more diversified and the internet is used as a means of communication. The case for “open-source unionism” begins by recognizing that traditional unionism and strategies for advancing it are not succeeding.

    Document
  • A report on the Milwaukee Jobs Initiative (MJI) and the successes thereof within the years 1997-2002.

    Document
  • ,. Pulling Apart: Wisconsin’s Strong 1990s Growth Masked Growing Inequality. COWS and Wisconsin Council on Children & Families, 2002.

    A report about Wisconsin’s growing inequality which outpaces the national trend.

    Document
  • Bernstein, J., H. Boushy, E. McNichol, and R. Zahradnik. Pulling Apart: A State by State Analysis of Income Trends. Economic Policy Institute and Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 2002.
    Despite economic growth in the 1990’s, income inequality is on the rise. This analysis examines trends in income inequality in each of the 50 states over the past two business cycles.
    Document
  • Freeman, R. B., and J. Rogers. Open Source Unionism: Beyond Exclusive Collective Bargaining. Working USA, 2002, pp. 8-40.

    A report on the benefits of “open source unionism”, unionization that is open to non-majority memberships which makes extensive use of the internet to deliver services to workers. This article describes current union activity heading in this general direction. It assesses the legal and administrative feasibility of open source unionism and suggests ways unions could develop it further.

    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Power and Reason”. Deepening Democracy: Institutional Innovations in Empowered Participatory Governance, Verso, 2002, pp. 237-55.

    This chapter in Archon Fung and Erik Olin Wright’s Deepening Democracy: Institutional Innovations in Empowered Participatory Governance, discusses that governments should seek to foster increased and effective public participation in governance and build new arenas for solving problems through citizen deliberation.

    Document
  • COWS report on “More Servants or a Better Society”, a research project that investigates why low-end service sector jobs have grown so dramatically in recent decades and how workers who fill those positions can improve their lot.

    Document
  • COWS report of a research project, “Economic Opportunity in a Volatile Economy,” that investigates labor market intermediaries (LMI). This research project is jointly sponsored with Working Partnerships USA.

    Document
  • COWS overview of the Advanced Manufacturing Project (AMP), a research consortium consisting of COWS staff and colleagues at the Center for Economic Regional Issues and the Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center.

    Document
  • Bernhardt, A., and L. Dresser. Why Privatizing Government Services Would Hurt Women Workers. COWS, 2001, p. 23.

    Prepared for the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

    This report analyzes the implications of privatization for women workers, especially those employed in low-end occupations. Data analyzed show that women disproportionately depend on the public sector for jobs that pay decent wages and offer benefits. This is especially true for African American and Hispanic women, and for women who do not have a college education. In part, higher wages and better access to health and pension benefits in the public sector can be attributed to higher rates of union coverage. The evidence suggests that privatizing government services will have a negative impact on women workers, especially those workers who are most vulnerable.

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  • A profile of The Local Child Care Wage Initiative and a discussion of the challenges that child care faces.
    COWS studied the effect of the Initiative on quality of care, turnover, and workers’ willingness to stay in the industry in this first briefing.

    Document
  • Beth Hughes , M., and D. E. Woods. From Stumps to Dumps: Wisconsin’s Anti-Environmental Subsidies. COWS, 2001.

    The purpose of this report is to point out some tax breaks, subsidies and regulatory exemptions granted to industries under state law that contradict Wisconsin’s stated environmental policies.

    Document
  • ,. Child Care Matters. 2001.

    Quick facts about child care at the national and state levels.

    Document
  • B. Freeman, R., and J. Rogers. Worker Representation…Again!. no. 3, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Labor and Employment Law, 2001, pp. 375-84.

    An introduction to the Symposium, “The Worker Representation and Participation Study (WRPS).”

    Document
  • Katz, B., and J. Rogers. “Metropolitan Power: The Next Urban Agenda”. The Next Agenda: Blueprint for a New Progressive Movement, Westview Press, 2001, pp. 189-10.

    A chapter in The Next Agenda: Blueprint for the New Progressive Movement, is a discussion of the challenges, including poverty, housing, transportation, and demographic factors, that metropolitan regions face. The next urban agenda should consist of the things it takes to harness the economic power of metro areas, improve the quality and equity of life within them, and move the country more generally onto the high-road of shared prosperity.

    Document
  • Bernstein, J., H. Boushey, C. Brocht, and B. Gundersen. Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families. 2001.

    This report estimates the number of families who are not making ends meet. We examine the cost of living in every U.S. community and determine basic family budgets for various family types in each one. In all, over 400 separate basic family budgets for six family types are generated. We then count the number of working families in each state whose incomes fall below these basic budgets. Next we examine the hardships these families experience. Finally, we explore how the U.S. can create a social safety net that recognizes that work is not always enough to help families meet their basic needs.

    Document
  • A report prepared for the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership (WMEP), this report analyzes supplier upgrading, evolving OEM-supplier relations, and directions for future manufacturing modernization policy and research in Wisconsin.

    This report is a follow up to Common Problems and Collaborative Solutions, a study of the changing relations between original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and their suppliers, with special focus on participants in the Supplier Training Program (STP) activities of the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Program (WMEP), as led by the OEM principals of the Supplier Training Consortium (STC).

    Document
  • , C. “Cant Afford to Lose a Bad Job”. Interfaith Coalition for Worker Justice Latino Workers Project, COWS, 2001.

    A report about the growth of Latino workers within Dane county. This report finds that Latino workers suffer from low wages, poor benefits, inconsistent work, outright discrimination and suspicion, and lack of access to basic services that many of us take for granted. The result is a constant struggle to make ends meet, while at the same time supporting relatives in their countries of origin. Documents include both the Full Report and a Summary.

    Document Document
  • As part of COWS evaluation of the Local Child Care Wage Initiative, COWS conducted interviews with some fifty child care center directors, teachers, and in-home care providers. This second report highlights the interviews and discussions with the child care workforce about work and wages.

    Document
  • The State of Working Wisconsin: Update 2001 is a brief investigation of the effects of the recent economic slowdown on workers in the state, as well as offering for the first time data on family hours of work and workers’ benefits, in addition to standard data on wages, unemployment and job growth.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Punishing Inequalities: Race and Criminal Justice in Wisconsin”. Wisconsin Academy Review, Vol. 47, no. 4, Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 2001, pp. 16-23.

    Wisconsin has the second most racially tilted criminal justice system in the country. Three UW- Madison law school professors put their heads together to illustrate the problem and point toward some solutions.

    Read more Document
  • Rogers, J. United States in Not Blameless. Madison Newspapers, Inc., 2001, p. 11A.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Editorial
    September 17, 2001

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  • Rogers, J. What’s Left? A New Life for Progressivism.”. Los Angeles Times, 2001.

    Reissued by The Nation (web edition, www.thenation.com, November 27, 2001).

    Document
  • Rogers, J. La Fin De l’innocence. La Revue Nouvelle, 2001, pp. 36-39.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. The Man From Elroy. The Nation, 2001.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Wish List For Wisconsin. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Economy Needs Old, New. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Economy Breeds Greed. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Working Women Left in Lurch. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. The Changing State of Work. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Inequalities Hit Middle Class. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Let’s Talk About the Big Issues. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Budget Bomb Incoming. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Stimulus Is Anything But. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Profiting from Terror. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Bush Presidency. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Get Fiscal House in Order. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Progressive Approach to Force. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Ending the War in Vietnam. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. The United States Is Not Blameless. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.
    The first document is edited.
    The second document is the original.

    Document Document
  • Rogers, J. U.S. Works More, for Less. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Workers Face Bitter Reality. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Social Costs Run High. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Make It Right to Begin With. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Better Energy Policy. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Don’t Give In to Almighty Market. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. We Control Energy Choices, But Within Limited Options. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Energy Success Stories. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Clean Energy Potential High. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. A Proposal for Investing $500 Million on Energy. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Anti-Green State Subsidies Cost Taxpayers Plenty. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Americans Show They Have a ’Wise Heart’. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Be It Resolved: ’Yes, There Is an Alternative’. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Public Should Be in the Know on Subsidies. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Wisconsin Could Take Lead in Clean Energy. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Rail Could Ease Commuters Nightmares. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Capitalism, Nature and Us. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Budget Shortfall Easy to Solve. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. High Taxes Are Really Not the Problem. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Citizens See Flaws, Disparity in Gov’s Budget. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Few Legislators Have Voice in Budget Process. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Gov’s Budget Is Key to State Policy Choices. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Progressivism’s Seeds Are Here for the Planting. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Workers Need Greater Voice, Power. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Where Are John and Jane Q. Public?. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Where Are John and Jane Q. Public?. The Capital Times, 2001.

    Sustaining Wisconsin Column
    Published in The Capital Times but often republished around the state, these were part of an 18-month public education campaign COWS ran before the 2002 WI gubernatorial primary election.
    NB: Not responsible for article titles.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin 2000. COWS.

    The economic expansion that began in 1991 has turned out to be longer and stronger than any other in American history. Over the last five years, economic growth and declining unemployment rates have started to bear fruit for working families’ incomes. Even so, the typical American family is working more hours, wage inequality remains high, poverty has stagnated rather than fallen, and poor job quality is still a serious American problem.

    Documents include both Full Report and Summary.

    Document Document
  • Building ‘Jobs With a Future’ in Wisconsin: Lessons from Dane County”. Nonstandard Work: The Nature and Challenges of Changing Employment Arrangements, Industrial Relations Research Association, 2000, pp. 341-59.

    This chapter assesses the potential and sustainability of industry partnerships in light of their ability to attract attention to industry needs from educators and trainers and in view of the weakness of unions.

    Document
  • Powerpoint presentation.
    October 28, 2000
    National Network of Sector Practitioners Conference
    Washington, DC
    Moving On Up: Building Career Paths in High-Wage and Low-Wage Sectors
    Career Pathways and the Emerging Economy, Joel Rogers

    Document
  • E. Woods, D., M. Orfield, and J. Rogers. Milwaukee Metropatterns: Sprawl and Social Separation in Metro Milwaukee. COWS, 2000, p. 36.

    An August 2000 report by COWS and MARC (Metropolitan Area Research Corporation) on metropolitan regional reform in Milwaukee and the strategic agenda that must be framed by the unique natural, demographic, political, and market characteristics of Milwaukee and Wisconsin.

    Documents include both Executive Summary and Full Report.

    Document Document
  • A Joint Report of COWS, the Institute for Wisconsin’s Future, and the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Barely Getting By: Wisconsin’s Working Poor Families documents key factors affecting this largely invisible segment of Wisconsin’s workforce, combining labor market and wage data with profiles of families from communities throughout the state. The report documents the surge in poverty-wage jobs in Wisconsin over the past 20 years, and its impact on workers and their families.

    Behind every economic trend or piece of data are real families. The report profiles five Wisconsin families whose stories describe the numerous challenges—beyond finding a good job—that the working poor face every day. The report concludes with policy recommendations to improve Wisconsin’s existing system of work supports and tax credits to more effectively assist working poor families.

    Document
  • This report examines individual OEMs’ (Original Equipment Manufacturer) supplier management strategies, focusing on commonalities and differences in their approach to broadly similar problems associated with supply-chain rationalization.. While all the OEMs in the study aim at getting their products quicker to the customer by trimming supply chains, establishing closer relationships with suppliers, and assisting them in performance improvement, each OEM follows a different path,  depending on its size, corporate structure, products, and markets. The report concludes with policy recommendations for the consortium.

    Document
  • Parker, E. “Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership: Hooking Community Residents Up to Jobs”. NFG Reports, Vol. 7, no. 2, Neighborhood Funders Group (NFG), 2000.

    An article regarding the Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership (WRTP) and the impact their work has had on the Wisconsin economy.

    Document
  • E. Wood, D., J. Rogers, and J. Witford. “At the Center of It All: The High Road Strategy for Menomonee Valley”. A Menomonee Valley Partners Report, COWS, 2000, p. 45.

    Written and produced for Menomonee Valley Partners by COWS, this report looks at the opportunities for “high-road” development in Milwaukee’s Menomonee Valley and offers recommendations to best redevelop the Menomonee Valley.

    Document
  • Mayrl, M. Proposed Elements of TIF Reform. COWS, 2000.

    A report with suggestions related to Tax Increment Financing (TIF) in Wisconsin, in order to begin a broader conversation around economic development policy in the state and to inform our analysis.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Pull the Plug. Vol. 52, no. 2, Administrative Law Review, 2000, pp. 743-68.

    An article about the two-party system and the struggles of the third-party in context of a representative gopvernment.

    Document
  • B. Freeman, R., and J. Rogers. “What Academics Can Do To Help Workers”. The Chronical of Higher Education, Vol. KLVI, no. 21, The Chronical of Higher Education, 2000.

    An article about academics’ role to help modernize the relationship between American employers and employees. Published January 28, 2000.

    Document
  • , C. Pulling Apart: The Strong Wisconsin Economy Masks Growing Inequality. COWS and Wisconsin Budget Project/Wisconsin Council on Children & Families, 2000.

    A report from about Wisconsin’s growing inequality (late 1970’s – publication).

    Document
  • Rogers, J., D. Wood, and M. Orfield. Milwaukee Metropolitics: A Regional Agenda for High-Road Growth. COWS, 2000.

    A report from COWS and the Metropolitan Area Research Corporation.

    Document
  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Manufacturing Disaster: The Great Japan Debate”. The Nation, no. 234, 1982, pp. 167-71.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. Elections 2000: A Bad Dream?. The Nation, 1999.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and E. Parker. “Sectoral Training Initiatives in the U.S.: Building Blocks of a New Workforce Preparation System”. The German Skills Machine: Comparative Perspectives on Systems of Education and Training , Berghahn Books, 1999, pp. 326-62.
    Document
  • Dresser, L., and J. Rogers. “Sectoral Strategies of Labor Market Reform: Emerging Evidence from the U.S.”. Vocational and Adult Education in Europe , Kluwer Academic, 1999, pp. 269-87.
    Document
  • Luria, D., and J. Rogers. Metro Futures: Economic Solutions for Cities and Their Suburbs. Boston: Beacon Press, 1999.
    Document
  • D Luria, D., and J. Rogers. Metro Futures. 1999.

    This essay answers the question of how cities got in to the current “mess”- a large reason contributer being inappropriate public policies.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., R. Richards, J. Rogers, and D. Salus. High Performance Partnerships: Winning Solutions for Employers and Workers. State of Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, 1999.

    This report introduces partnerships currently operating in Wisconsin and the theory behind them. It also demonstrates that the partnership systems are replicable by outlining the steps taken to develop a partnership of any scale and in any industry.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., D. Lange, and A. Sirkus. Improving Retention of Frontline Caregivers in Dane County. COWS, 1999.

    This report examines the range of experience with Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) turnover and seeks to identify some of the best local practices that reduce turnover among CNA and staff.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Sectoral Strategies of Labour Market Reform: Emerging Evidence from the United States”. Vocational and Adult Education in Europe, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, pp. 269-87.

    This article compares the “American Model” of labour market regulation in the United States to outside countries, particularly in Europe.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Making Work Pay. Vol. 40, no. 10, Madison Magazine, 1998, p. 17.

    A discussion about legislation before the Madison City Council and Dane County Board about mandating a “living wage” for employees of local government and of firms contracting with or receiving economic assistance from that government.

    Document
  • This report provides an overview of the work to date between the Dane County Economic Summit Council and the Center on Wisconsin Strategy to develop industry partnerships, analyze the labor market, and help design a better integrated system of labor market administration.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “A Strategy for Labor”. The Changing Nature of Work, Island, 1998, pp. 241-4.

    This article offers suggestions for a strategy to revive labor by examining the general condition for successful union organization and then presenting a stylized model of “traditional unionism” to contrast with the recommended alternative.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., S. Mangum, and J. Rogers. The State of Working Wisconsin. COWS, 1998.

    Using a variety of data on wages, family incomes, taxes, unemployment, and wealth and poverty, The State of Working Wisconsin 1998 examines the impact of today’s economy on the living standards of Wisconsin workers and their families. Throughout, we try to put current Wisconsin experience in perspective — through comparisons to national experience and Wisconsin’s own economic past.

    Documents below include the Executive Summary and the Full Report.

    Document Document
  • Freeman, R., and J. Rogers. “What Do Workers Want? Voice, Representation and Power in the American Workplace”. Employee Representation in the Emerging Workplace: Alternatives/Supplements to Collective Bargaining, Kluwer Law International, 1998, pp. 3-31.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and J. Cohen. Asociaciones Secundarias Y Gobierno democratico. Vol. 84-85, Zona Abierto, 1998, pp. 3-122.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and J. Cohen. “Can Egalitarianism Survive Internationalization?”. Internationale Wirtschaft, Nationale Demokrati , Campus Verlag, 1998, pp. 175-93.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. Turning to the Cities: A Metropolitan Agenda. Vol. 22, In These Times, 1998, pp. 14-17.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and R. Freeman. Trg Delovne Sile: Nobeno Kosilo Ni zastonj. Razgledi, 1998, pp. 10-11.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and R. Teixeira. “Mastering the New Political Arithmetic: Volatile Voters, Declining Living Standards, and Non-College-Educated Whites”. Unraveling the Right, Westview Press, 1998, pp. 228-47.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and L. Dresser. “Networks, Sectors, and Workforce Learning”. Jobs and Economic Development: Strategies and Practices, Sage, 1998, pp. 64-82.

    Reprinted in Institute for Research on Poverty Reprint Series 783 (Madison: Institute for Research on Poverty, 1998). With L. Dresser.

    Document
  • Rogers, J., and A. Fung. ‘High Road’ Job Creation: The New Party’s Urban Agenda. Dollars and Sense, 1997, pp. 30-33.
    Document
  • This report describes changes in the labor market that have contributed to the breakdown of systems that once provided workers with clear signals and good training. It also discusses the results of those changes for incumbent workers and new labor market entrants, focusing on the growing problems that workers face. The report describes a series of projects that seek to overcome those problems and discusses some elements of theory that might unite practice on the ground and help identify the ways that these distinct projects could grow to develop further leverage in jobs systems.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. Labor and Economic Development. 1997.

    This essay defines the role labor needs to play in the economy. Developing a strategy to have its voice heard, labor can take part in decision making that affects the direction of economic development.

    Document
  • This document is a methods and strategy guidebook for organizations working in depressed urban areas to help area residents get good family supporting jobs. Looking at the demand side, the report suggests ways that organizations can identify opportunities in the local economy.

    Document
  • Luria, D., and J. Rogers. A New Urban Agenda. no. 22, Boston Review, 1997, pp. 3-8.

    An article that states the importance of an urban strategy to save cities through metro reconstruction.

    Document
  • Rogers, J. “The Folks Who Brought You The Weekend: Labor and Independent Politics”. Audacious Democracy , Houghton Mifflin, 1997, pp. 11-20.

    An article about the need for labor to develop a new, organizational strategy to better position themselves in economic and political decision-making processes.

    Reprinted in Working USA 1 (November/December 1997): 11-20.

    Document
  • Dresser, L., J. Rogers, and J. Whittaker. The State of Working Wisconsin 1996. 1996.

    The State of Working Wisconsin provides a statistical portrait of the economic status of Wisconsin workers and their families. Drawing on the most recent  data available, it maps Wisconsin performance on such leading economic indicators of worker well-being as household and family income, wages, inequality, and taxes.
    Documents below include the Executive Summary as well as Full Report.

    Document Document
  • Rogers, J. “Response to Jeffrey Isaac and The Poverty of Progressivism”. Dissent, Vol. 43, no. 4, Foundation for the Study of Independent Social Ideas, Inc., 1996, pp. 55-56.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and B. Colburn. What’s Next... A Winning Strategy for Progressives. Vol. 263, The Nation, 1996, pp. 11-18.
    Document
  • Parker, E., and J. Rogers. “The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership: Lessons For National Policy”. National Center for the Workplace Paper #3, 1996.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “My Utopia or Yours?”. Equal Shares: Making Market Socialism Work, New York: Verso, 1996, pp. 93-109.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “What Do Workers Want? Findings of the Worker Representation and Participation Survey”. Contemporary Issues in Labor and Employment Law, New York: Little, Brown and Company, 1996, pp. 279-87.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “An Alternative Democratic Platform”. In These Times, 1996, pp. 14-15.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Social Welfare”. In These Times, 1996, pp. 18-9.
    Document
  • Freeman, R. B., and J. Rogers. Die Quintessenz: Der Inneramerikanischen Debatte. Mitbestimmung, 1996, pp. 12-7.
    Document
  • Bosworth, B., and J. Rogers. Using Regional Economic Analysis in Urban Jobs Strategies. Cambridge: Regional Technology Strategies, 1996.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and R. Teixeira. Volatile Voters: Declining Living Standards and Non-College-Educated Whites. Washington D.C.: Economic Policy Institute , 1996.
    Document
  • Dunworth, T., and J. Rogers. “Corporations in Court: Big Business Litigation in U.S. Federal Courts, 1971-91”. Law & Social Inquiry, no. 21, 1996, pp. 497-2.
    Document
  • Kenworthy, L., S. Macaulay, and J. Rogers. “‘The More Things Change...’: Business Litigation and Governance in the American Automobile Industry”. Law & Social Inquiry, no. 21, 1996, pp. 631-78.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Necessary Complements”. Boston Review, no. 21, 1996, pp. 11-12.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Why We Need an Independent Politics”. Dissent, no. 43, 1996, pp. 91-94.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “What To Do Now”. Boston Review, no. 21, 1996, p. 16.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “After Liberalism”. The Good Society, no. 6, 1996, pp. 18-24.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “A Strategy for Labor”. 34, 1995, pp. 367-81.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “How We Might Unite”. The New American Crisis, New York: The New Press, 1995, pp. 289-10.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and R. Teixeira. “Who Deserted the Democrats in 1994?”. American Prospect, no. 23, 1995, pp. 73-76.
    Document
  • Freeman, R., and J. Rogers. “Worker Representation and Participation Survey: First Report of Findings”. Proceedings of the 47th Annual Industrial Relations Research Association Meetings, Madison: IRRA, 1995, pp. 336-45.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Worker Representation and Participation Survey: First Report”. Dialogues, no. 3, 1995, pp. 1-2.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Shut Up and Listen”. Solidarity, 1995, p. 28.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “How Divided Progressives Might Unite”. The New Left Review, no. 210, New York: New Party, 1995, pp. 3-32.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. Associations and Democracy. London: Verso, 1995.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and W. Streeck. “Productive Solidarities: Economic Strategy and Left Politics”. Reinventing the Left, Polity Press, 1994, pp. 128-45.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “My Utopia or Yours?”. Politics & Society, Vol. 22, no. 4, Sage Foundation, 1994, pp. 507-21.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and W. Streeck. “Productive Solidarities: Economic Strategy and Left Politics”. Reinventing the Left, London: Polity Press, 1994, pp. 128-45.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Talking Union”. The Nation, no. 259, 1994, pp. 784-5.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “State of the Unions (and Why You Should Care)”. Inc, no. 16, 1994, pp. 23-24.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “The Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership: A National Model for Regional Modernization Efforts?”. Proceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting of the Industrial Relations Research Association, Madison: IRRA, 1994, pp. 403-11.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and W. Streeck. “Workplace Representation Overseas: The Works Councils Story”. Working Under Different Rules, New York: Russell Sage Foundation for NBER, 1994, pp. 97-156.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Is It Third Party Time?”. In These Times, no. 4, 1993, pp. 28-29.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. Reforming U.S. Labor Relations. no. 69, Chicago Kent Law Review, 1993, pp. 97-127.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “”. The Challenge of Restructuring: North American Labor Movements Respond, Philedelphia: Temple University Press, 1993, pp. 48-71.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Progressive Reform and the Clinton Moment”. State of the Union, Boulder: Westview, 1993, pp. 250-66.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and C. Sabel. “Imagining Unions”. Boston Review, no. 18, 1993, pp. 10-12.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Associative Democracy”. Market Socialism, New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, pp. 236-52.
    Document
  • Freeman, R., and J. Rogers. “Who Speaks for Us? Employee Representation in a Non-Union Labor Market”. Employee Representation: Alternatives and Future Directions, Madison: IRRA, 1993, pp. 13-79.
    Document
  • Rogers, J., and J. Cohen. “Associations and Democracy”. Social Philosophy and Policy, Vol. 10, no. 2, Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation, 1993.
    Document
  • Nader, R., and J. Rogers. Building a Working Democracy. 1993.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “A Toolkit for Regulatory Reform”. Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 22, New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, pp. 338-9.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “Can We Get There From Here? Workforce Readiness and Apprenticeship”. Challenges for Apprenticeship and Vocational Training in the 1990s: German and American Perspectives, 1992, pp. 48-58.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “No Way Out: American Politics in 1992”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1992, pp. 74-77.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Clintons Victory”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers) , 1992, pp. 60-63.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “”. The Nation, no. 255, 1992, pp. 102- 105.
    Document
  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Secondary Associations and Democratic Governance”. Politics and Society, no. 20, 1992, pp. 393- 472.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “What Needs to Be Done for Labor to Flourish”. Economic Notes, no. 60, 1992, p. 11.
    Document
  • Rogers, J. “In the Shadow of the Law: Institutional Aspects of Postwar U.S. Union Decline”. New Directions in Legal History, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992, pp. 283- 302.
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  • Rogers, J. “Traveling Light: State Theory and Sociolegal Research”. Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, no. 11, 1991, pp. 287- 293.
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  • Galanter, M., S. Macaulay, T. Palay, and J. Rogers. “The Transformation of American Business Disputing: A Sketch of the Wisconsin Project”. DPRP Working Paper, no. 10-6, Madison: Institute for Legal Studies, 1991, pp. 1-33.
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  • Parker, E., J. Rogers, and W. Streeck. “The Wisconsin Training Effort”. Dollars and Sense, Vol. 2, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991, pp. 1-35.
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  • Rogers, J., and M. Galanter. “A Transformation of American Business Disputing? Some Preliminary Observations”. Disputes Processing Research Program, Vol. 10, no. 3, Institute for Legal Studies, 1991.

    An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Law & Society Association Annual Meetings in 1988, and provided the basis for subsequent presentations at the University of Wisconsin, The American Bar Foundation, Ohio State University, Hofstra University, and The International Institute for the Sociology of Law in Onati, Spain.

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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Knowledge, Morality and Hope: The Social Thought of Noam Chomsky”. New Left Review, 1991, pp. 5-27.
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  • Wisconsin Metalworking Training Consortium: Recommendations for Action.

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  • Rogers, J., and D. Cantor. Party Time. COWS, 1990.

    Some thoughts on a political party strategy for progressives in the 1990s.

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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “The Politics of Dealignment: The 1990 Elections in the U.S.”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1990, pp. 50-53.
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  • Rogers, J. What Does "high Road" mean?. 1990.

    First and foremost, “high road” (HR) denotes a family of strategies for human development under competitive market conditions that treat shared prosperity, environmental sustainability, and efficient democracy as necessary complements, not tragic tradeoffs.

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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. Divide and Conquer: Further ’Reflections on the Distinctive Character of American Labor Laws’. University of Wisconsin Law Review, 1990, pp. 1-147.
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  • Rogers, J. “Divide and Conquer: The Legal Foundations of Postwar U.S. Labor Policy”. Critical Legal Thought: An American German Debate , Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 1989, pp. 213- 235.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Reaganomics- Zweiter Teil”. Links, no. 222, 1988, pp. 19- 21.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Reaganism After Reagan”. The Socialist Register, London: Merlin Press, 1988, pp. 387- 424.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Going Nowhere Fast: The 1988 Elections in Perspective”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1988, pp. 50-57.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Too Much of Nothing? American Politics Enters the Post-Reagan Era Part II”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1988, pp. 58-63.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Too Much of Nothing? American Politics Enters the Post-Reagan Era Part I”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1988, pp. 12-17.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Life After Reagan: The Future of American Politics”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1988, pp. 44-50.
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  • Rogers, J. “Another Brief for Business”. Law and Society Review, no. 21, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1988, pp. 753-63.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “Iranscam-Contragate: Its Impact on U.S. Politics”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1987, pp. 32-37.
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  • Rogers, J. “Sarah E. Evans and Harry C. Boyte, Free Spaces: Sources of Democratic Change in America”. Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 16, New York: Harper & Row, 1987, pp. 667-8.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “The Worst and the Dumbest: Perspectives on the Reagan Era”. Monthly Review, no. 38, New York: Monthly Review Press, 1987, pp. 42-51.
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  • Rogers, J. “Labor & Nicaragua”. The Nation, no. 245, 1987, pp. 472-3.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Big Business Deserts the Democrats”. The Nation, no. 243, 1986, pp. 18 -19.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “”. The Atlantic, no. 257, 1986, pp. 43- 53.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “”. The Texas Observer, no. 78, 1986, pp. 9- 12.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Der Mythos Vom Rechtsruck”. Links, no. 200, 1986, p. 59.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Eine Neue Politik Ohne Neue Wehler: Der Rechtsruck Der Demokraten in Den U.S.A.”. Leviathan, no. 14, 1986, pp. 255-89.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Big Business Backs the Freeze”. The Nation, no. 243, 1986, pp. 43- 47.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “The Midterm Elections in the United States”. The Economist (Mainichi Newspapers), 1986, pp. 30-36.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. Right Turn: The Decline of the Democrats and the Future of American Politics. New York: Hill & Wang, 1986.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. Inequity and Intervention: The Federal Budget and Central America. Boston: South End Press, 1986.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. Rules of the Game: American Politics and the Central American Movement. Boston: South End Press, 1986.
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  • Rogers, J. “Will the Giant Awaken?”. Against the Current, London: Verso, 1986, pp. 27-32.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “The True Cost of Intervention”. The Nation, no. 242, 1986, pp. 513-6.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Labor Day, 1985”. The Nation, no. 241, 1985, pp. 165-5.
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  • Rogers, J. “The Politics of Voter Registration”. The Nation, no. 239, 1984, pp. 45-51.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Les démocrates Sur La Corde raide”. Le Monde Diplomatique, no. 364, 1984, pp. 8-9.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. “After the Fall”. The Boston Review, no. 9, 1984, pp. 18-20.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Big Labor Is Hurting- Itself”. The Nation, no. 239, 1984, pp. 144-5.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Why Mondale Turned Right”. The Nation, no. 239, 1984, pp. 313-5.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “”. Le Monde Diplomatique, no. 368, 1984, pp. 2-3.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Die Mondale-Katastrophe”. Links, no. 175, 1984, pp. 28 -29.
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  • Cohen, J., and J. Rogers. On Democracy. New York: Penguin Books, 1983.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Neoliberals and Democrats”. The Nation, no. 234, 1982, pp. 781-6.
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  • Bessel, R., E. Feuchtwanger, and J. Rogers. David Abraham, The Collapse of the Weimar Republic: Political Economy and Crisis. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1981, pp. 452-4.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Der Sieg Reagans: Interessengruppen Und Ihre Koalitionen in Der Wahlkampagne Von 1980”. Probleme Des Klassenkampfs, 1981, pp. 57-86.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “More Than Academic: Oligopoly in the Idea Market”. The Nation, no. 233, 1981, pp. 303-8.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “La défaite Du Mouvement Syndical américain”. Le Monde Diplomatique, no. 332, 1981.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “The Reagan Victory: Corporate Coalitions in the 1980 Campaign”. The Hidden Election: Politics and Economics in the 1980 Presidential Campaign, New York: Pantheon Books, 1981, pp. 3-64.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Another Trilateral Election?”. The Nation, no. 230, 1980, pp. 783-87.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Empire As a Way of Life”. The Nation, no. 231, 1980, pp. 123-24.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “”. Le Monde Diplomatique, no. 317, 1980.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “The Empire Strikes Back”. The Nation, no. 231, 1980, pp. 436-40.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Labor Law Reform and Its Enemies”. The Nation, no. 228, 1979, pp. 17-20.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “The State of the Unions”. The Nation, no. 228, 1979, pp. 462-65.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. Un Capitalisme Divise. no. 306, 1979.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “How Business Saved the New Deal”. The Nation, no. 229, 1979, pp. 589-92.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “The Knights of the Roundtable”. The Nation, no. 229, 1979, pp. 620-5.
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  • Rogers, J. Robert Justin Goldstein, Political Repression in Modern America. Cambridge: Schenkman Publishing Company, 1978, pp. 1233-4.
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  • Ferguson, T., and J. Rogers. “Miller of the Fed”. The Nation, no. 227, 1978, pp. 134-6.
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  • Rogers, J. “U.S. Still in Vietnam”. Politicks and Other Human Interests, 1977, p. 24.
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  • Rogers, J. “Stumbling Towards Stockholm”. Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 6, pp. 703-7.
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  • Rogers, J. “Productive Democracy”. New Visions of Market Governance: Crisis and Renewal, Routledge, pp. 171-88.
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  • Rogers, J. “Everything That Moves: Union Leverage and Critical Mass in Metropolitan Space”. Central Labor Councils and the Revival of American Unionism: Organizing for Justice in Our Communities , M.E. Sharpe, pp. 35-52.
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  • Rogers, J., and R. Teixeira. America’s Forgotten Majority. The Atlantic Monthly, pp. 66-75.
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  • Rogers, J. Joel Rogers CV.